Ready or not, winter weather is on its way.

Part beautiful, part treacherous, snow and ice storms can wreak havoc on homes, businesses, and travel plans from coast to coast.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.


And though you may be bundling your coat, climate experts say there's a major culprit to blame: global warming.

Nonfiction comic artist Andy Warner illustrated this helpful lesson from Kevin Trenberth of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, who details how climate change is behind some of our most recent snowstorms. (Whether or not the president-elect would like to believe it.)

All illustrations by Andy Warner, used with permission.

With storms potentially intensifying due to climate change, it's best to be prepared.

Whether it's a blizzard, hurricane, earthquake, or zombie attack, it's important to keep some basic supplies on hand in your home and car in case of emergency.

Since electricity and emergency resources may not be available, your home-based kit should include enough drinking water and nonperishable food for each person in your household to live on for three days. It should also include items like flashlights, a radio, a battery-operated cell phone charger, a first-aid kit, blankets and/or warm clothes, and any prescription medicine you're currently taking. And if you have a pet, don't forget to include food and water for them as well.

Photo by iStock.

A smaller, but similar kit for your car should also include jumper cables, road flares or cones, an ice scraper, and hand warmers.

As climate change makes our weather patterns more intense and less predictable, we need to learn to adapt.

That means preparing and looking out for friends and neighbors when the worst happens. But it also means getting out there and making the most of the snow. It's not going anywhere — might as well enjoy it.

Ziggy plays in the snow in Melville, New York. Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images.

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


Remember those beloved Richard Scarry books from when you were a kid?

Like a lot of people, I grew up reading them. And now, I read them to my kids.

The best!

If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

Image via

Scarry was an incredibly prolific children's author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.

But here's something you may not have known about these classics: They've been slowly changing over the years.

Don't panic! They've been changing in a good way.

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Photo by Maxim Hopman on Unsplash

The Sam Vimes "Boots" Theory of Socioeconomic Unfairness explains one way the rich get richer.

Any time conversations about wealth and poverty come up, people inevitably start talking about boots.

The standard phrase that comes up is "pull yourself up by your bootstraps," which is usually shorthand for "work harder and don't ask for or expect help." (The fact that the phrase was originally used sarcastically because pulling oneself up by one's bootstraps is literally, physically impossible is rarely acknowledged, but c'est la vie.) The idea that people who build wealth do so because they individually work harder than poor people is baked into the American consciousness and wrapped up in the ideal of the American dream.

A different take on boots and building wealth, however, paints a more accurate picture of what it takes to get out of poverty.

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"Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937) and actor Peter Dinklage.

On Tuesday, Upworthy reported that actor Peter Dinklage was unhappy with Disney’s decision to move forward with a live-action version of “Snow White and the Seven Drawfs” starring Rachel Zegler.

Dinklage praised Disney’s inclusive casting of the “West Side Story” actress, whose mother is of Colombian descent, but pointed out that, at the same time, the company was making a film that promotes damaging stereotypes about people with dwarfism.

"There's a lot of hypocrisy going on, I've gotta say, from being somebody who's a little bit unique," Dinklage told Marc Maron on his “WTF” podcast.

"Well, you know, it's really progressive to cast a—literally no offense to anybody, but I was a little taken aback by, they were very proud to cast a Latino actress as Snow White," Dinklage said, "but you're still telling the story of 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Take a step back and look at what you're doing there.”

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