Two teens who secretly hung fake McDonald’s poster for 51 days are getting a huge reward.

Jehv Maravilla and Christian Toledo noticed a lack of diversity in McDonald’s advertising. So they took matters into their own hands.

Using a bit of brilliant ingenuity, the pair created their own fake McDonald’s poster and placed it inside a Pearland, Texas restaurant.

“We were eating McDonald’s one day and we looked around and saw there were posters around that didn’t have any Asians,” Maravilla said. “They had other races but no Asians so we felt like it was our duty to put ourselves up there.”


To pull off their prank they bought used McDonald’s uniforms at a local Goodwill store and made their own fake company badges that identified them as “Regional Interior Coordinators.”

And then somehow they managed to hang the sign in the local McDonald’s restaurant without any of the other employees, management, or customers catching on to their scheme.

And it stayed there for 51 days until the pair revealed the prank on Twitter.

And then Ellen got involved and things got even better.

After their reveal, Ellen DeGeneres had the two young men on her show -- where she upped the ante with a major reveal of her own.

Instead of getting angry, McDonald’s announced that it is in fact going to use Maravilla and Toledo in a new advertising campaign to help showcase more Asian diversity. And they’re getting paid $25,000 each for it.

McDonald’s congratulated the pair on their own Twitter account, writing: “You guys earned this dream. Looking forward to more work from the best “Regional Interior Coordinators” we’ve ever had!

As for that sneaky sign? McDonald's says it is auctioning it off for charity and the proceeds will go to the Ronald McDonald House charity in Houston.

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Seeing someone who has a long record of sobriety—especially after a very public struggle—can be motivating and inspiring for others in different stages of their recovery journey. That's part of why actor Rob Lowe's announcement that he's reached 31 years sober is definitely something to celebrate.

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Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

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The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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