This preschool inside a retirement home makes perfect sense for both kids and seniors.

Welcome to the Intergenerational Learning Center, a preschool and nursing home rolled into one.

An older resident helps a little boy button his jacket. All images via "Present Perfect."


What if you could take all the best things about kids — like their honesty, energy, or optimism — and all the best things about seniors — their stories, patience, and worldly wisdom — and put all that magic in the same room?

That's exactly the thinking behind the Intergenerational Learning Center in Seattle, Washington.

The ILC sits inside Providence Mount St. Vincent, which is home to over 400 permanent senior citizen residents. In addition to the seniors, 125 young children attend preschool there, their days filled with art classes, music, and more.

What's makes the ILC different is that a few times a day, the seniors and the kids get together for joint exercise, storytelling sessions, lunch, and more.

And the results are absolutely amazing. For everyone.

Spending time with kids is great for seniors physically and mentally.

The seniors and kids interact every day, whether they're exercising, doing crafts, or just hanging out.

Long-term senior care can sometimes be pretty bleak. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 80% of older adults have at least one chronic health condition, which can lead to high levels of depression. A 2009 study estimated as many as about 28% of seniors in nursing homes take antidepressants for either major or minor depression.

Intergenerational-care groups have found that older adults who are able to spend time with children enjoy better emotional, mental, and physical health. Some say that those seniors wind up burning more calories and performing better on memory function tests when they spend time with children, too.

Putting aside the science and the research mumbo jumbo, you can see all you need to see in these seniors' smiles.

You're never too old to enjoy the parachute game.

Being around seniors is good for the kids, too.

Coloring! We told you it was the best.

It's great that this program is a positive thing for Providence Mount St. Vincent's seniors, but if it weren't a good thing for the children, too, the program wouldn't have lasted long.

And that's where the beauty of the ILC really lies.

While the kids are dancing, playing, or even just talking with the seniors, they're learning things like patience and acceptance. Some research actually shows that children in programs like this one go on to show better academic performance and stronger social maturity later on in life.

The seniors are good companions, and they're great at silly hand games, too.

Again, though, if we look beyond the research and the developmental advantages, we see these natural, intergenerational friendships just make sense.

The ILC isn't the only program in the country that's finding new ways for different generations to learn from each other.

Seattle's Intergenerational Learning Center was the subject of a recent documentary called "Present Perfect," which is getting a lot of attention. In the years since the ILC opened in 1991, roughly 500 programs like it have popped up all over the country.

Hopefully, with the film's release slated for sometime next year, we'll see even more support for this innovative approach to education and healthcare.

True

This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

via Brittany Kinley / Facebook

Brittany Kinley, a mother from Mansfield, Texas, had a hilarious mom fail her and she's chalking it up to being just another crazy thing that happened in 2020.

When Kinley filled out the order form for her son Mason's kindergarten class pictures, there was an option to have his name engraved into the photos. But Kinley wasn't interested in having her son's name on the photos so she wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" on the box.

Well, it appears as though she should have left the box blank because the computer or incredibly literal human that designed the photographs wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" where mason's name should be.

Keep Reading Show less
True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
popular

Funny how a 'new' male problem is a very old problem for women. Amy Poehler explains.

Not many people are brave enough to talk back to the guy who co-created "Chappelle's Show" when he says something kinda clueless. But not many people are Amy Poehler.

Men struggle to comprehend the pressures women feel. The same is true of women!

Gah! We'll never get along.

This conversation between comedian Neal Brennan and Amy Poehler is a pretty good example of how hard it can be to figure life out sometimes.

Neal, the genius who co-created "Chappelle's Show," sat down with Amy for his show "The Approval Matrix." The topic? WHAT are men supposed to be now? Cool? Adorkable? Both? Neither?

Keep Reading Show less
via UDOT / Facebook

In December 2018, The Utah Department of Transportation opened the largest wildlife overpass in the state, spanning 320 by 50 feet across all six lanes of Interstate 80.

Its construction was intended to make traveling through the I-80 corridor in Summit County safer for motorists and the local wildlife.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that there were over 100 animal incidents on the interstate since 2016, giving the stretch of highway the unfortunate nickname of "Slaughter Row."

Keep Reading Show less