This new sex ed series for adults is funny, sexy, and actually educational.

Let's face it: Sex education in America is ... lacking.

Best-case scenario, you'll get a hyperdetailed biology lesson interspersed with some anxiety-inducing descriptions of nightmarish STIs. Or you might hear about all the ways unplanned pregnancies will ruin your life so don't mess it up, kids. On the other end of the spectrum, there's "abstinence-only education," which hardly counts as educational.

For all the progress that we have made on sex and sexuality, it's still difficult for kids to figure out how to have sex beyond an overly-simplistic understanding of "in and out." The things they do learn are more likely to come from movies or ill-informed locker room banter than from a trusted adult.


All GIFs from Fck Yes/YouTube.

That's why four L.A. filmmakers are on a mission to change sex ed from awkward anatomy videos to a resounding "F*ck yes."

Their journey began when co-creators Erica Anderson and Emily Best shared an epiphany over a bottle of wine about how much their sex lives had changed in their 30s. They realized that while the idea of talking about sex induced a lot of anxiety in people, actually talking about sex was sexy in and of itself — and also helped to improve the act.

"We have culturally reinforced the notion that talking about sex 'spoils the mood' — that communication is somehow anathema to great sex," said Best. "Consent is not an arbitrary requirement but in fact quite possibly the sexiest part of the whole deal."

So they reached out to their friends and fellow sex-positive filmmakers, and that's how "F*ck Yes" was born.

The first four episodes of the steamy new web series have already been watched by hundreds of thousands of people.

Perhaps most surprisingly, their largest viewership is in India.

Each episode clocks in at around three minutes and uses raw, open honesty to explore the ways that consenting adults negotiate their sexual relationships. How do you find out if someone wants to come back to your place and have sex? How do you handle protection, and what do you do if no one has any? How do you find out what your partner enjoys — or how do you get them to try something a little different?

These moments can be crucial turning points in any relationship, and "F*ck Yes" strives to dramatize it in a way that's realistic and educational. Sure, the conversations can be awkward, but the show doesn't shy away from that either — after all, awkwardness is a part of sex more often than not, and people need to know that that's OK too.

"Who could show girls, women, boys, and men what desire looks and sounds like in a healthy, consensual, and sexy way?" Anderson said. "We wanted to make sexy shorts that show that talking about sex and their desires actually leads to more and better sex."

The series is honest and real, and its instant popularity just goes to show how important good sex ed can be to people.

"Everyone needs examples of healthy sexual situations and ways in which they can utilize consent and enthusiastic consent," said Lauren Schacher, a co-creator on the show who also serves as a director and actor. "People WANT to know more about how to be more comfortable with sex and their own sexualities. But this is still only a fraction of the conversation."

For the show's second season — which has already surpassed its fundraising goal — the creators plan to include crowdsourced stories from viewers, to make sure that every aspect of sexuality is included in the conversation.

"Consent is for furries, too. Seriously," said producer, writer, and co-creator Elisabeth Aultman. "People with stigmatized orientations and desires are just as entitled to yes and no as anyone else, and if we can subvert some narratives and do some normalization as part of this project than I'm 100% about it."

With issues of consent at the center of so many conversations lately, F*ck Yes is just the kind of raw, honest entertainment we need.

While the show was created by women, people of any gender can benefit from the lessons learned in "F*ck Yes" — after all, sexual pleasure and communication should be universal positives. The creators have been collaborating with sex education and rape prevention groups around the country to help spread their message too.

Check out the full series on YouTube or watch a bonus episode about bad sex advice below:

True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less

Working parents have always had the challenge of juggling career and kids. But during the pandemic, that juggling act feels like a full-on, three-ring circus performance, complete with clowns and rings of fire and flying elephants.

With millions of kids doing virtual learning, our routines and home lives have taken a dramatic shift. Some parents are trying to navigate working from home at the same time, some are trying to figure out who's going to watch over their kids while they work outside the home, and some are scrambling to find a new job because theirs got eliminated due to the pandemic. In addition to the logistical challenges, parents also have to deal with the emotional ups and downs of their kids, who are also dealing with an uncertain and altered reality, while also managing their own existential dread.

It's a whole freaking lot right now, honestly.

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


via msleja / TikTok

In 2019, the Washoe County School District in Reno, Nevada instituted a policy that forbids teachers from participating in "partisan political activities" during school hours. The policy states that "any signage that is displayed on District property that is, or becomes, political in nature must be removed or covered."

The new policy is based on the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 Janus decision that limits public employees' First Amendment protections for speech while performing their official duties.

This new policy caused a bit of confusion with Jennifer Leja, a 7th and 8th-grade teacher in the district. She wondered if, as a bisexual woman, the new policy forbids her from discussing her sexuality.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of Tiffany Obi
True

With the COVID-19 pandemic upending her community, Brooklyn-based singer Tiffany Obi turned to healing those who had lost loved ones the way she knew best — through music.

Obi quickly ran into one glaring issue as she began performing solo at memorials. Many of the venues where she performed didn't have the proper equipment for her to play a recorded song to accompany her singing. Often called on to perform the day before a service, Obi couldn't find any pianists to play with her on such short notice.

As she looked at the empty piano at a recent performance, Obi's had a revelation.

"Music just makes everything better," Obi said. "If there was an app to bring musicians together on short notice, we could bring so much joy to the people at those memorials."

Using the coding skills she gained at Pursuit — a rigorous, four-year intensive program that trains adults from underserved backgrounds and no prior experience in programming — Obi turned this market gap into the very first app she created.

She worked alongside four other Pursuit Fellows to build In Tune, an app that connects musicians in close proximity to foster opportunities for collaboration.

When she learned about and applied to Pursuit, Obi was eager to be a part of Pursuit's vision to empower their Fellows to build successful careers in tech. Pursuit's Fellows are representative of the community they want to build: 50% women, 70% Black or Latinx, 40% immigrant, 60% non-Bachelor's degree holders, and more than 50% are public assistance recipients.

Keep Reading Show less