Instagram / Sia & Twitter / gisellenjh

The holidays are all about counting our blessings and giving to others for no reason other than it's the right thing to do. Recently, Sia captured the essence of the season by taking a shopping spree like no other.

The day before Thanksgiving, Sia went into a Palm Springs Wal-Mart and payed for the purchases of several shoppers. Sia's real name is Sia Kate Isobelle Furler, but on that fateful day, she told shoppers her name was CiCi and had just won the lottery, which was why she was in a giving mood.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

The New York City subways can be miserable, but one Brooklyn-bound L train became a lot more festive when a pop-up Thanksgiving feast appeared onboard. It was like Friendsgiving, but the friends were strangers that you'd fight for a seat if it ever came down to it. It's nice to be reminded that New Yorkers can display a strong sense of community when the occasion presents itself.

A table with a full Thanksgiving feast was set up in the middle of the car. Collard greens, mashed potatoes, homemade mac and cheese, cider, stuffing, and of course, turkey, were available to everyone riding the car. The table was even draped with a table cloth, making this subway Thanksgiving dinner a classy affair. After a prayer, everyone on the train was allowed to eat. All in all, about 40 people were fed on the train.

Keep Reading Show less
Cities

Anticipating tough conversations with your relatives? This hotline has your back.

Showing Up for Racial Justice took inspiration from the Butterball hotline.

If you need help with your Thanksgiving turkey, there's a hotline for that. Now there's one for your Thanksgiving dinner conversation, too.

That's the idea behind Showing Up for Racial Justice's Holiday Mobile Hotline, now in its second year. Created for white Americans who want to help fight for a more racially just society, SURJ's hotline is a great resource to have handy for potentially awkward race-related dinner-table conversations during upcoming holidays.

"We thought it up last year after hearing so many white folks really freaking out about seeing family after Trump was elected," explains SURJ co-director Heather Cronk in an e-mail. "The original idea was built on the Butterball hotline — the service provided by Butterball turkey each Thanksgiving to help folks get answers to their turkey-cooking questions."

Keep Reading Show less
More

Thanksgiving is a time for family, friends, and gathering together in gratitude. And that doesn't have to change if you're an American living overseas.

As the unofficial kickoff of the "holiday season," Thanksgiving is a celebration of all things American: food, family, football, and colonialism. And the pull of cozy traditions and comfort food can be mighty this time of year — even for those who've left the United States behind to live abroad.

I wanted to find out how U.S. expats celebrate the most American holiday of them all, so I connected with a few women who live overseas with their families. They told me about some of the more, well, surprising challenges they've faced — including a potato embargo! — along with new customs they couldn't wait to try.

Keep Reading Show less
Most Shared