Wikipedia

Native Hawaiians are protesting the construction of a $1.6 billion telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest mountain. For 17 straight days, the protesters have successfully blocked the roads leading up to the location as an attempt to halt construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project. Now, "Aquaman" star and Hawaii-born Jason Momoa has joined the fight, using his star power to raise awareness for the issue.

He doesn't just play a superhero in the movies, he's also one in real life. Momoa's efforts are working because the issue has gained national attention. Sporting a green leaf lei around his neck and crown on his head,he appeared in front of the protesters to present a ho'okupu (a "formal offering wrapped in ti leaf") and told them, "We are not going anywhere," according to the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.


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Nature

When your roommate eats the last Oreo in the freezer, that's an annoyance. When your roommate eats the last Oreo you'll see in months, you might have a problem.

On Sept. 17, six volunteer crew members emerged from eight months of isolation. Their quarantine, part of a NASA-backed study by the University of Hawaii, could one day help humanity plan a drama-free Mars mission.

For the last eight months, the six volunteers lived in a tiny shelter on the slopes of an active volcano, sharing their living space, meager kitchen, and solitary shower.

From a distance, their house-sized habitat looked like a golf ball sitting in the loneliest sand trap in the universe. Photo from HI-SEAS V Crew/University of Hawaii News/Flickr.

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Heroes

On Aug. 9, Oregon became the fifth state to raise the legal age to purchase tobacco products to 21.

Oregon has been at the forefront of tobacco cessation and prevention programs for more than 20 years. A 1996 voter-approved tobacco taxation and prevention initiative has prevented an estimated 31,000 Oregon children from picking up the habit, and cigarette use has declined by more than 50% in the state.

The latest tobacco bill, signed by Governor Kate Brown, will continue to build on these efforts, prohibiting the sale and use of cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and tobacco products to people under the age of 21.

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Family

What you should know about the sweeping smoking laws in California.

'We're going to reduce health care costs and save lives.'

Hey, people smoke. And quitting is hard.

I am not about to shame anyone who lights up. As most smokers know all too well, it's a ridiculously hard habit to kick — and even just cutting back a bit can be a major headache (literally).

That's why expansive new measures in California to stop would-be young smokers from ever lighting up in the first place is an incredibly welcome change.

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Family