Look at the photos and videos of thousands of youth demanding climate change action NOW.

Watch out, world. The kids have shown up—and they are not here for our b.s. excuses.

Last year, 15-year-old Greta Thunberg sat on the steps of Swedish parliament, alone, to protest inaction on climate change. Today, at 16, she is leading hundreds of thousands of youth—and adult supporters—in a global school strike, filling the streets of cities and towns around the world for the same purpose.  

Her singular act of protest has turned into a massive movement of young people who are fed up with politicians and leaders playing Russian roulette with their future. On Friday, March 15, students are leaving school to tell governments that young people want immediate and meaningful action on the global climate crisis.


Thunberg and others have already sat on the steps of parliament buildings every Friday in a #FridaysforFuture movement, trying to urge governments to urgently enact policies that will help stave off accelerated global warming.

Today, that movement took a dramatic leap forward.

You have to see the hundreds of thousands of young people showing up at these rallies to believe it.

As of Friday morning, school strikes and rallies were taking place in more than 2000 locations in 123 countries. Check out these photos and videos pouring in from around the globe:

Several thousand people in New York City, U.S., with more on the way.

10,000+ people demonstrated in Copenhagen, Denmark.

At least 5,000 marched in Helsinki, Finland.

In Milan, Italy, people showed up by the tens of thousands—and even more attended rallies in 200 other locations in Italy alone.

Dublin, Ireland—again, numbers in the thousands.

25,000 students filled the streets of Berlin, Germany.

Are we getting the picture yet? Everyone who said that kids would just be skipping school to skip school were dead wrong.

The idea that kids don't really care about this or aren't educated enough about climate change to know what they're protesting is absurd. Kids learn about science and government in school. Scientists around the globe have made it clear that we have to get rising global temperatures under control or face dire consequences to life on our planet, while governments play political and economic games as they always do.

Kids don't care about such games. They want to inherit a healthy, habitable planet—and they're willing to fight for it.

Like these kids in Cape Town, South Africa:

And in Barcelona, Spain:

Check out the Maori Haka at the school strike at Nelson College, New Zealand.

Maori Haka at the school strike at Nelson College, NZ.Tens, maybe hundreds of thousands students in New Zealand, Australia and East Asia. They are setting the standard high!Latest global update say:2052 places in 123 countries on all continents, including Antarctica. So, the question is:What will you do on March 15 2019? #schoolstrike4climate #FridaysForFuture #climatestrike #WhateverItTakes

Posted by Greta Thunberg on Friday, March 15, 2019

Are you tearing up yet? There's more:

Check out Hong Kong:

And Delhi, India:

And Ottawa, Canada:

And Lisbon, Portugal:

And Madrid, Spain:

This isn't a cute little demonstration; it's a global phenomenon. And it was all started by one teenager who refused to accept leaders' excuses for lack of action on climate change.

Kudos to Greta, for starting such an inspiring worldwide movement. Get out of the way, grown-ups. The youth have arrived to save us all.

True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less

Biases, stereotypes, prejudices—these byproducts of the human brain's natural tendency to generalize and categorize have been a root cause of most of humanity's problems for, well, pretty much ever. None of us is immune to those tendencies, and since they can easily slip in unnoticed, we all have to be aware of where, when, and how they impact our own beliefs and actions.

It also helps when someone upends a stereotype by saying or doing something unexpected.

Fair or not, certain parts of the U.S. are associated with certain cultural assumptions, perhaps none more pinholed than the rural south. When we hear Appalachia, a certain stereotype probably pops up in our minds—probably white, probably not well educated, probably racist. Even if there is some basis to a stereotype, we must always remember that human beings can never be painted with such broad strokes.

Enter Tyler Childers, a rising country music star whose old-school country fiddling has endeared him to a broad audience, but his new album may have a different kind of reach. "Long Violent History" was released Friday, along with a video message to his white rural fans explaining the culminating track by the same name. Watch it here:

Keep Reading Show less
True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less

The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn’t something we’d choose—and we’d hope others wouldn’t choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

Keep Reading Show less
@frajds / Twitter

Father Alek Schrenk is known as one of the "9 Priests You Need to Follow on Twitter." He proved his social media skills Sunday night after finding a creepy note on a parked car and weaving a lurid Twitter tale that kept his followers on the edge of their pews.

Father Schrenk was making his nightly walk of the church grounds to make sure everything was fine before retiring to the rectory, when he found a car parked by itself in front of the school.

Curious, he looked inside the car and saw a note that made his "blood run cold" attached to the steering wheel. "Look in trunk!" the note read. What made it extra creepy was that the two Os in "look" had smiley faces.

Keep Reading Show less