Sarah Nicole Landry's awesome as-is body photos are a vital message for swimsuit season.

Swimsuit season is a time great angst for many women. But it doesn't have to be this way.

Some of us do a pretty good job of appreciating our bodies, right up until it's time to put on a swimsuit. Then the questions start flying: Does this suit make me look chunky? Do my boobs look weird? Do my thighs look like cottage cheese? Is my pooch too obvious? Is my butt too big?

After that come the "Ugh, look" statements. Ugh, look at that cellulite. Ugh, look at that roll. Ugh, look at that back fat, those saddlebags, those cankles.

And finally, the judgments. I'm too out of shape. I should cover that up. No one wants to see that. My [fill in the body part] looks so gross. I'm too embarrassed to be seen like this.


This woman's powerful 'before and after' photos crush myths about body positivity.

And there it is. The swimsuit season body bashing that comes too easily to too many of us. We know it's not healthy to do this to ourselves. We know that we should love our bodies even if they aren't perfect. We know that we don't need to look like a Victoria's Secret model to go to the beach… and yet we end up back at this familiar place in front of the mirror every summer.

Sometimes we need a firm reminder that the way our bodies look in a swimsuit isn't something we need to fret about. Like, at all.

Sarah Nicole Landry's awesome as-is photos of her body come with this vital message.

Landry is the woman behind The Birds Papaya—a blog, an Instagram page, and a newly minted podcast—and her take on body positivity is inspiring thousands.

For example, in a post on Instagram, Landry shared a photo of the skin on her belly squished into a heart with her fingers.

"Many of us have skin like this," she wrote, "From whatever growth or change happened in our bodies.⁣⁣

Skin that wrinkles and folds, yet is soft and delicate. Skin that did a good job. Skin that did exactly what it was supposed to do."

"Sharing this was not an act of bravery," she wrote. "It was a moment of me wanting to show up and share something that I'd come to learn was normal. It was from the desire to find connection and peace in my own body by freeing myself of the holds of a lie that said this skin, MY SKIN, was the reason why I could never have a 'good body.'" ⁣⁣

Another photo she shared on Facebook and Instagram is resonating with thousands as we slide into swimsuit season.

It's a picture of Landry by the pool in a one-piece swimsuit, looking gorgeous—but not "model-perfect."

Landry's message with the photo drives home the point that we don't owe the world anything. We can show up just as we are.

There's something powerful in being seen and accepted just the way we are in this moment.

In a world of Photoshop and airbrushing, anytime a woman shares a photo of her honest-to-goodness body, it gives others permission to feel comfortable in their own.

Jameela Jamil has some choice words for Amber Rose about promoting a diet tea to pregnant women.

The body positivity movement has been around for a while now, and more and more women are sharing unapologetic photos of their real bodies. But honestly, there can never be too many reminders that our bodies are okay as-is. That we don't need to be embarrassed by cellulite or avoid the pool because we have a pooch. That we can show up and be here in our own skin.

Bodies are constantly changing anyway. Some of us are super fit in this moment, and that's great. Some of us have baby-bearing bodies, and that's great. Some of us are good with our girth, and that's great. Some of us want to lose pounds for various reasons, and that's great too. Whatever your body is right now is what it is. It may change, it may not.

But it doesn't have to be anything other than what it is in this moment for you to be here, worthy and accepted, just as you are.

True

Temwa Mzumara knows firsthand what it feels like to watch helplessly as a loved one fights to stay alive. In fact, experiencing that level of fear and vulnerability is what inspired her to become a nurse anesthetist. She wanted to be involved in the process of not only keeping critically ill people alive, but offering them peace in the midst of the unknown.

"I want to, in the minutes before taking the patient into surgery, develop a trusting and therapeutic relationship and help instill hope," said Mzumara. Especially now, with Covid restrictions, loved ones are unable to be at the side of a patient heading to surgery which makes the ability to understand and quiet her patients' fears such an important part of what she does.

Temwa | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Dedicated to making a difference in the lives of her patients, Nurse Mzumara is one of the four nurses featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series by CeraVe® that honors nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to their patients and communities.

Keep Reading Show less
Canva

As millions of Americans have raced to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, millions of others have held back. Vaccine hesitancy is nothing new, of course, especially with new vaccines, but the information people use to weigh their decisions matters greatly. When choices based on flat-out wrong information can literally kill people, it's vital that we fight disinformation every which way we can.

Researchers at the Center for Countering Digital Hate, a not-for-profit non-governmental organization dedicated to disrupting online hate and misinformation, and the group Anti-Vax Watch performed an analysis of social media posts that included false claims about the COVID-19 vaccines between February 1 and March 16, 2021. Of the disinformation content posted or shared more than 800,000 times, nearly two-thirds could be traced back to just 12 individuals. On Facebook alone, 73% of the false vaccine claims originated from those 12 people.

Dubbed the "Disinformation Dozen," these 12 anti-vaxxers have an outsized influence on social media. According to the CCDH, anti-vaccine accounts have a reach of more than 59 million people. And most of them have been spreading disinformation with impunity.

Keep Reading Show less
True

Nicole Abate, a Registered Medical-Surgical Nurse living in New Mexico, starts her workday around 5:00 a.m. During her 20-minute drive to work, she gets to watch the sun rise over the Sandia Mountains as she sips her coffee.

"It's one of my favorite things to do," said Nurse Abate. "A lot of us need a little calm before the storm."

Nicole | Heroes Behind the Masks Presented by CeraVe youtu.be

In March 2020, after a fairly quiet start to the year, Nurse Abate's unit became the official COVID unit for her hospital. "It went full force after that," she says. Abate was afraid, overwhelmed with uncertainty, never knowing what was next on the wild roller coaster in this new territory, "just when you think ...we know exactly what we're doing, boom, something else hits so you adapt… that's part of nursing too." Abate faced her responsibilities courageously and with grace, as she always does, making life a little better for patients and their families "Thank you for taking care of my father," reads one recent letter from a patient's family. "You were kind, attentive and strong and we are truly grateful."

Keep Reading Show less