Powerful images emerge as the world reacts to Brussels attacks.

A quote by Fred Rogers has become a go-to reaction to disaster.

On March 22, 2016, more than 30 people were killed in terrorist attacks in Belgium's capital city, Brussels.

Terrorist organization ISIS claimed responsibility for the destruction.


Airport staff hug as passengers are evacuated from Zaventem airport after the attack. Photo by Sylvain Lefevre/Getty Images.

There's a famous quote by Fred Rogers about looking for "helpers" amid disaster.

It can be applied to just about any devastating situation, but it always seems especially poignant after a terrorist attack:

"When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, 'Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.' To this day, especially in times of 'disaster,' I remember my mother's words and I am always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers – so many caring people in this world." — Fred Rogers

It's easy to look at disaster and see the worst in people. It's easy to question your faith in humanity after such an event. It's easy to become completely and totally apathetic, to let cynicism win. But if you look closely, you can see the helpers Mister Rogers spoke of.

The response to this morning's terrorist attack in Belgium is no different: Helpers are out there.

A message written on the ground near the city's center reads "Brussels is beautiful." Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images.

Using hashtags like #IkWillHelpen ("I want to help") and #PorteOuverte ("open house"), the people of Brussels offered shelter to those with nowhere to stay.

After the attacks, people were left without housing and without a means to travel elsewhere. This is what makes the #IkWillHelpen and #OpenHouse hashtags such a necessary, loving response in the face of terror. Embracing strangers instead of shunning them will always be the most human response to tragedy.


Public transportation quickly became overwhelmed, so the helpers of the world did what they could to ensure safe passage.

Cars began picking up strangers at bus stops, giving them rides.


A hashtag popped up for people willing to help organize a carpool.

People leave messages and flowers outside the stock exchange building in the city center of Brussels. Photo by Nicolas Maeterlinck/AFP/Getty Images.

Others created tributes to the victims in solidarity with neighboring France, which was struck by an attack last November.

Two images picturing the color of the Belgian flag — a drawing by French cartoonist Plantu and the famous Belgian comic character Tintin — in tribute to victims of triple bomb attacks in the Belgian capital. Photo by Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images.

A woman leaves a bouquet of flowers next to a French national flag with the words "Paris Brussels Solidarity" at the fence of the Belgian embassy in Paris. Photo by Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty Images.

Politicians around the world weighed in, but two statements stand out in highlighting the importance of compassion, understanding, and, yes, helpers.

The first comes from U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison, praising the helpers of Belgium:

"One of the goals of these terrorists is to drive us apart through fear and hatred. The people of Belgium are reminding us why terror will never succeed. They are providing shelter to tourists and strangers throughout the country, and the hashtag '#ikwillhelpen,' which means 'I want to help' in Flemish, is trending throughout Europe."

A sign reading "Share your love" stands at a memorial at Place de la Bourse in Bordeaux, France. Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images.

The other is from President Obama, speaking from Cuba:

"We stand in solidarity with them in condemning these outrageous attacks against innocent people. We will do whatever is necessary to support our ally Belgium in bringing to justice those who are responsible. We must be together regardless of nationality or race or faith in fighting against the scourge of terrorism. We can and we will defeat those who threaten the safety and security of people all around the world.”

A Belgian flag reads "We are all Brussels" at the Place de la Bourse memorial. Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images.

Sometimes the world can be a dark place. What's important is that we don't forget about the light that follows it.

We can't fight hate with more hate. We must look to those who refuse to respond out of hatred or vengeance, but instead with a message of love and peace. That's how humanity wins.

More
Courtesy of Houseplant.

In America, one dumb mistake can hang over your head forever.

Nearly 30% of the American adult population — about 70 million people — have at least one criminal conviction that can prevent them from being treated equally when it comes to everything from job and housing opportunities to child custody.

Twenty million of these Americans have felony convictions that can destroy their chances of making a comfortable living and prevents them from voting out the lawmakers who imprisoned them.

Many of these convictions are drug-related and stem from the War on Drugs that began in the U.S. '80s. This war has unfairly targeted the minority community, especially African-Americans.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

Climate change is happening because the earth is warming at an accelerated rate, a significant portion of that acceleration is due to human activity, and not taking measures to mitigate it will have disastrous consequences for life as we know it.

In other words: Earth is heating up, it's kinda our fault, and if we don't fix it, we're screwed.

This is the consensus of the vast majority of the world's scientists who study such things for a living. Case closed. End of story.

How do we know this to be true? Because pretty much every reputable scientific organization on the planet has examined and endorsed these conclusions. Thousands of climate studies have been done, and multiple peer-reviewed studies have been done on those studies, showing that somewhere between 84 and 97 percent of active climate science experts support these conclusions. In fact, the majority of those studies put the consensus well above 90%.

Keep Reading Show less
Nature
via James Anderson

Two years ago, a tweet featuring the invoice for a fixed boiler went viral because the customer, a 91-year-old woman with leukemia, received the services for free.

"No charge for this lady under any circumstances," the invoice read. "We will be available 24 hours to help her and keep her as comfortable as possible."

The repair was done by James Anderson, 52, a father-of-five from Burnley, England. "James is an absolute star, it was overwhelming to see that it cost nothing," the woman's daughter told CNN.

Keep Reading Show less
Heroes

I live in a family with various food intolerances. Thankfully, none of them are super serious, but we are familiar with the challenges of finding alternatives to certain foods, constantly checking labels, and asking restaurants about their ingredients.

In our family, if someone accidentally eats something they shouldn't, it's mainly a bit of inconvenient discomfort. For those with truly life-threatening food allergies, the stakes are much higher.

I can't imagine the ongoing stress of deadly allergy, especially for parents trying to keep their little ones safe.

Keep Reading Show less
popular