There's nothing like a good reunion story to get you misty in the ol' tear ducts. Kate Howard, the managing editor of Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting, shared a story of randomly running into the dog she used to foster on Twitter. You know all those dog reunion movies? The ones with names like A Dog's Hope and A Dog's Sloppy Kiss? The ones that make you cry buckets no matter how hard you think your heart is? Well, this is that, but in real life.



The name sounded familiar to Kate, and for a very good reason.


According to the American Humane Association, one in 10 pets are given up six months after they're adopted from a shelter, with destructive behaviors and disobedience cited in the top reasons why they're returned.

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Kate running into Winnie was – dare we say it – an act of destiny.

Winnie was also introduced to Kate's dog, Foxy.

Kate's story resonated with other dog-owners and dog-lovers on Twitter.







Kate was also inspired by her own experience.


RELATED: Dog owners are more likely to kiss their dogs than their significant others

Taking a dog into your home also gives the dog a safe space to stay in until they're adopted. Sometimes a rescue group doesn't have space, so they rely people to take in dogs out of the goodness of their hearts. Other times, a dog is just too young to go into a shelter.

Fostering a dog can make all the difference in the life of a troubled pooch. It can help a dog iron out behavior issues, making them more likely to be accepted into their new home. Currently, 44% of households have dogs, and 23% of dogs were obtained through an animal shelter or humane society.

And sometimes it has a happy ending, like this story.

via Jeremy Hogan / YouTube

Vauhxx Booker, a civil rights activist from Bloomington, Indiana, claims that a group of white men threatened to lynch him during an altercation on July 4 near Lake Monroe, but he was saved by onlookers who intervened.

Video taken during the incident shows he was held down by a group of men who pinned him to a tree in a wooded area. Booker says that while he was being held down, the men threatened to break his arms, repeatedly said "get a noose," and told his friends to leave the area.

The men later let him go after being confronted by onlookers who gathered at the scene.

The incident began, according to Booker, when he and his friends were making their way to the lake to see the lunar eclipse when a white man on an ATV told them they were trespassing. When Booker and his friends continued to walk to the lake, the man on the ATV and his friends allegedly shouted "white power" at them, which is when things turned violent.

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