Meghan Markle and Prince Harry just delivered a very personal and positive message to sex workers.
Photo by Toby Melville/Getty Images

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry stopped by the charity One25 unannounced in Bristol where Markle and Prince Harry got to work helping pack lunches meant to be distributed to sex workers.

As part of its larger set of initiatives, One25 provides 150 sex workers with food bags on a nightly basis.

Markle Spontaneously asked for a magic marker and began to scrawl inspirational messages on the bananas. "Do you have a sharpie?" Markle says in a video of the day. "I have an idea."


“I’m in charge of the banana messaging,” Markle can be heard saying in a videoTweeted out by Kensington Palace, as she wrote supportive words such as "You are strong,""You are brave," "You are special," and "You are loved” over the fruit.

In a brilliant and heart warming move, Markle took inspiration from an American school lunch program.

According to DailyMail’s Rebecca English, Markle said, "I saw this project this woman had started somewhere in the States on a school lunch program. On each of the bananas she wrote an affirmation, to make the kids feel really, like, empowered. It was the most incredible idea—this small gesture.”

One25 helps women “break free from street sex work, addiction, and other life-controlling issues and build new, independent lives."

“Our approach to giving unconditional love and support is what builds trust — and how that works and helps them move on,” Smith told People. “At the bottom of all this is self-esteem and self-worth for the women who may have come from a background of being sexually abused or a life in care and where their families don’t support them in the way they should.”

Smith said of Markle’s gesture:  “To be told by someone in the public eye that they are worth it and that they value what they’ve said and done is a massive part of that process,” said Smith.

Although the messages weren’t directed towards the volunteers at One25, the volunteers were still touched by Markle’s words. "It sounds really cheesy, but little things like that when you are out, especially tonight, just to get that little thing that Meghan took her time out to write that one, it's lush,” one of the volunteers told Hello.

Markle’s supportive words got a ton of support on Twitter as well.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.