+
upworthy
Pop Culture

Keke Palmer's baby reveal on 'Saturday Night Live' inspires hope to those with PCOS

Her hilarious monologue ignited a conversation between others living with the condition.

keke palmer snl, keke palmer pregnant

Baby, it's Keke Palmer.

Sure, folks are talking about Keke Palmer’s epic baby bump reveal on “Saturday Night Live” because it’s a masterclass in comedic timing. Seriously, nobody does it like Keke Palmer.

But for those living with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and hoping to one day announce their own pregnancy, it became a much more meaningful conversation.

Joking that she would ”set the record straight,” the 29-year-old “Nope” star revealed a pregnant belly hidden underneath her trench coat, adding that it has been “the biggest blessing.” As fans were quick to note—this news is especially positive since Palmer has been open about her own struggles with PCOS.


The actress shared her diagnosis back in December 2020 via Instagram, saying the condition was "attacking [her] from the inside out" but she “had no idea.”

Getting a proper diagnosis was already a difficult task—as Palmer mentioned, it was a struggle to get her doctors to take her concern seriously since she “looked healthy.” But once her condition was confirmed, she began speaking out as a way to empower others who might find themselves in similar situations.

The post included a picture of an acne flare-up, something she noted was the “least harmful” symptom PCOS could bring. In addition to skin problems, the hormonal imbalance—which is quite common, affecting 1 in 10 women of childbearing age—can also lead to irregular periods, ovarian cysts, weight gain and, of course, infertility.

However, as the Office on Women's Health explains, PCOS is treatable (even if it isn’t curable), and does not mean that pregnancy is impossible. Sometimes only milder forms of treatment are necessary—like weight loss, different combinations of medications to promote ovulation or hormone therapy. Other times, more complex procedures such as assisted reproductive technology (like IVF) or surgery are needed.

All this to say, PCOS might not prevent pregnancy altogether, but it can cause major stress to those struggling to conceive, which is why Palmer’s joyous announcement struck a chord.

Many were inspired to share their own fertility victories. As one person wrote, “I was told it was going to be very difficult for me to have children. And I was so scared and crushed. But I was blessed with three girls in four years! I don’t know what I did to deserve it, but I’m very fortunate."

“My PCOS baby <3 Definitely congratulations to Keke! I know the feeling,” wrote another, alongside a photo of their newborn.

One person commented that they are “currently 24 weeks pregnant with our second child after secondary infertility for 6 years and treatments! PCOS & endometriosis had doctors tell me I wouldn’t get pregnant because of my weight but met the most amazing specialists who helped us.”


It’s worth noting that while losing weight can help with PCOS, doctors have been guilty of implicit bias against overweight patients, leading them to focus on judgments that are solely weight-based. This, of course, blinds them from seeing the whole picture, which is why finding an empathetic, open-minded specialist can be very important.

Others felt that Palmer’s success story made their own dreams of starting a family seem more possible.

One person tweeted, “As a woman with PCOS seeing Keke Palmer pregnant and also having PCOS is truly amazing. The first thing you think about after your diagnosis is 'Will I ever have kids?' God always has the last say so, so I know when my time comes it will be one of my greatest testimonies."


It’s important to see others overcome challenges similar to our own. That said, no two lives are the same, and it would be insensitive to assume that everyone has the same access to resources or solutions. But still, stories like Palmer's help illuminate what’s possible, and those are always stories worth sharing.

True

Implementing simple energy- and water-efficiency upgrades in US households would save nearly $200B per year in residential utility bills.

Unfortunately, these upgrades are often unaffordable or inaccessible for the average US home.

Growing up in West Virginia, my community was largely part of the 1/3 of Americans who can’t afford their energy bills, let alone the efficient home tech upgrades that would make these bills affordable.

This is why Kaitlin Highstreet and I founded Scope Zero, where we created the Carbon Savings Account™, or CSA. The CSA is similar to a health savings account, where employers and employees both contribute funds to the account. With the CSA, the employees use the money for home technology and personal transportation upgrades that reduce their utility bills, fuel spend, and carbon footprint.

CSA-eligible upgrades include everything from Energy Star refrigerators, low-flow showerheads, smart thermostats, and LEDs, to home solar and EVs.

Keep ReadingShow less
via Pexels

A woman sitting cross-legged on a yoga mat

Everyone wants to know how long they will live and there are many indicators that can show whether someone is thriving or on the decline. But people have yet to develop a magic formula to determine exactly how long someone should expect to live.

However, a doctor recently featured on the "Today" show says a straightforward test can reveal the likelihood that someone aged 51 to 80 will die in the near future.

NBC News medical contributor Dr. Natalie Azar was on the "Today" show on March 8 and demonstrated how to perform the simple “sit to stand test” (aka sit-rising test or SRT) that can help determine the longevity of someone between 51 to 80.

Keep ReadingShow less

Ashley Nicole simply explains companion planting.

Gardening influencer Ashley Nicole (@momjeansandgardenthings) has an easy tip for everyone having a hard time with their plants dying and getting destroyed by pests. It’s a time-honored technique called “companion planting,” where your main crop is surrounded by plants that repel bad insects and attract the good ones.

Nicole founded the blog Mom Jeans and Garden Things, where she shares “tips, tricks, and ideas on ways to grow your own herbal beauty routine.”

“If you’re a beginner gardener and you’re confused about companion planting, this simple formula is going to make everything make sense,” Nicole says in the clip. “There are three main components to companion planting. There’s the main crop … the flower, and the herb.”

Keep ReadingShow less
Image pulled from YouTube video.

Cats for sale.


These mustached Canadians decided to treat older shelter cats like used cars.

Why?

Keep ReadingShow less
Curiosity Show/YouTube

The Ames window trick.

Optical illusions are universally beloved for how they trick our brains and blow our minds. There's a reason we enjoy magic shows and Escher paintings and are mesmerized by fake oases in the desert. We love seeing things that bend our perceptions of reality, and the science behind the magic always proves fascinating as well.

Keep ReadingShow less
via wakaflockafloccar / TikTok

It's amazing to consider just how quickly the world has changed over the past 11 months. If you were to have told someone in February 2020 that the entire country would be on some form of lockdown, nearly everyone would be wearing a mask, and half a million people were going to die due to a virus, no one would have believed you.

Yet, here we are.

PPE masks were the last thing on Leah Holland of Georgetown, Kentucky's mind on March 4, 2020, when she got a tattoo inspired by the words of a close friend.

Keep ReadingShow less

"The Carol Burnett Show" had one of the funniest outtakes in TV history.

"The Carol Burnett Show" ran from 1967 to 1978 and has been touted as one of the best television series of all time. The cast and guest stars of the show included comedic greats such as Tim Conway, Betty White, Steve Martin, Vicki Lawrence, Dick Van Dyke, Lyle Waggoner, Harvey Korman and others who went on to have long, successful comedy careers.

One firm rule Carol Burnett had on her show was that the actors stay in character. She felt it was especially important not to break character during the "Family" scenes, in which the characters Ed and Eunice Higgins (a married couple) and Mama (Eunice's mother) would play host to various colorful characters in their home.

"I never wanted to stop and do a retake, because I like our show to be ‘live,’" she wrote in her memoir, as reported by Showbiz Cheat Sheet. "So when the ‘Family’ sketches came along, I was adamant that we never break up in those scenes, because Eunice, Ed, and Mama were, in an odd way, sacred to me. They were real people in real situations, some of which were as sad and pitiful as they were funny, and I didn’t want any of us to break the fourth wall and be out of character.”

It was a noble goal, and one that went right out the window—with Burnett leading the way—in a "Family" sketch during the show's final season that ended with the entire cast rolling with laughter.

Keep ReadingShow less