+
There are lots of wins to celebrate this year for Indigenous Peoples Day
Open Education and Indigenous Education Fishbowl discussio… | Flickr

Whether as a way to bring power to more marginalized voices, or to lessen the "white-washing" of American history … or maybe just as a simple F-U to the patriarchy, many are trading in Columbus Day for Indigenous Peoples Day.

There are several wins for Native Americans that might make Indigenous Peoples Day more celebratory this year. Things like:

More recognition for the new holiday

President Joe Biden made history last Friday (Oct. 8) after issuing a proclamation calling on the country to honor Native Americans and incorporate more "appropriate ceremonies and activities." He recognized the inherent sovereignty and resilience of Indigenous cultures and marked their contributions to society as invaluable.





Biden's proclamation marks a more formal reflection of what many states have already been doing. According to CNN, 21 of our 50 states have begun incorporating Indigenous Peoples Day, whether in official or unofficial observation. And that list is growing. Though it doesn't include the state of Massachusetts (yet), cities such as Boston observed the holiday for the first time; it held a ceremony in a town just outside of where the Boston Marathon was held.


Indigenous art and humor is being celebrated in the mainstream

I'll start with my hero Taika Waititi, whose script "Jojo Rabbit" won the Oscar in 2020 for Best Adapted Screenplay. He also gets my personal MVP award for somehow making Hitler quirky and fun. If you haven't familiarized yourself with Waititi's magical blend of irreverence and a bizarre sense of humor, you can get a taste of it in his acceptance speech here:

Taika Waititi's Hilarious Acceptance Speech for Jojo Rabbit's Adapted Screenplay Win | EE BAFTA Filmwww.youtube.com


Speaking of Taika, his other project, "Reservation Dogs," debuted on Hulu this year and is already receiving ample critical praise. This dark comedy, which centers around a group of four Indigenous teenagers seeking to escape their Oklahoma reservation, or rez for short, depicts the Native American community as three dimensional, nuanced and endearing, rather than victimized or supporting characters. No reductive clichés here. Okay, well maybe there are for the white supporting characters. But to be fair, it's pretty hilarious.

Humor that truly reflected Indigenous culture was a major priority for the show's creators. In an interview with Vogue, Steven Harjo, Taika's co-writer on the project, stated, "There hasn't been any Native humor onscreen, and I've always wanted to bring it to a mainstream audience. Native humor is very sophisticated." With a goofy Native American ghost warrior, some fresh native slang and a few hella-funny rap battles, I'd say they did just that.



Taika isn't the only one making huge leaps for the native art community. The new Cahokia Socialtech + Artspace in Phoenix, Arizona celebrated its grand opening today. According to az.central.com, the space was established by co-founders and partners Eunique Yazzie (Navajo) and Melody Lewis (Hopi, Tewa and Mojave). The two were "inspired by the original Cahokia, the largest pre-Columbian city in North America." Like the original city, the Cahokia Artspace is intended to "bring together the knowledge and creativity of Indigenous people in a central gathering place." The article added that since its soft opening in September, the space has been host to "youth events, art markets, virtual conferences, art exhibits, even the Hopi tribal leadership debate in advance of tribal elections."

Because good stories can often do the most for social change, lifting up the stories of Native Americans is a simple, yet profound way to bring about real transformation.

Indigenous culture is even being represented in a digital space

The Native Land app is an entirely new way to pay respects to Indigenous culture. You can type in your address and then see which native groups once occupied the land. I decided to test it out:

Screen shot from Native Land appNative Land app

In his About page, the app's inventor, Victor Trempano said that Native Land "seeks to encourage people — Native and non-Native — to remember that these were once a vast land of autonomous Native peoples, who called the land by many different names according to their languages and geography." He added, "The hope is that it instills pride in the descendants of these People, brings an awareness of Indigenous history and remembers the Nations that fought and continue to fight valiantly to preserve their way of life."

Just taking a bird's-eye view at all the Indigenous nations that once did occupy the land does instill a sense of utmost respect.

More ancestral land is returning back to natives

Though one glance at the Native Land app might present a bleak outlook on the topic, the good news is: From sacred mountains to to nearly 1 million acres, many Native American lands have been restored to their rightful owners.

Cultural Survival reported that in the last two years alone, eight ancestral lands have been recovered. This included the cancellation of the Keystone XL pipeline in Canada as well as native land being restored in Oklahoma, Cambodia, Peru, Panama, Australia and Belize.


More education about Indigenous culture

Perhaps the egregious aspect of colonization is the obliteration of an entire culture from history. Minus that one Native American diorama that third-graders make each year, we simply aren't educated about our real "forefathers." What's worse, we raise monuments and tell romanticized stories to honor them while downplaying those who have been devastated by their actions.


The fact that we're finally realizing that Native American history is American history, though bittersweet, still marks steps in the right direction.

North Dakota passed a bill in April that requires all schools to teach Native American history, culture and treaty rights. And more efforts to preserve and honor Native American language have been made, with Canada's first-ever bachelor's degree focusing on Indigenous language fluency, and The United Nations declaring 2022-2032 to be the Decade of Indigenous Languages.


Indigenous Peoples Day was originally created in 1990 as a means to shift the narrative away from Christopher Columbus as a "hero discoverer" and bring back the forgotten voice and sovereignty to those most victimized by him: Native Americans. That's why big changes, like completely rebranding a holiday, are necessary. It brings awareness, empathy and, as noted above, real progress. It might feel like anti-patriotism to some, but to others, it's finally restoring some sense of balance.

It also might feel like a linguistic "splitting of hairs." However, the last few years have really shown us that language should evolve to include all of society. For the Native American community, there's more to it than simply taking out Christopher Columbus' name. It's about giving a name to their collective story. It's about saying "we have been here, and we continue to be here."

To everyone—Native or not—I wish you all a happy Indigenous Peoples Day.


Pop Culture

Artist uses AI to create ultra realistic portraits of celebrities who left us too soon

What would certain icons look like if nothing had happened to them?

Mercury would be 76 today.

Some icons have truly left this world too early. It’s a tragedy when anyone doesn’t make it to see old age, but when it happens to a well-known public figure, it’s like a bit of their art and legacy dies with them. What might Freddie Mercury have created if he were granted the gift of long life? Bruce Lee? Princess Diana?

Their futures might be mere musings of our imagination, but thanks to a lot of creativity (and a little tech) we can now get a glimpse into what these celebrities might have looked like when they were older.

Alper Yesiltas, an Istanbul-based lawyer and photographer, created a photography series titled “As If Nothing Happened,” which features eerily realistic portraits of long gone celebrities in their golden years. To make the images as real looking as possible, Yesiltas incorporated various photo editing programs such as Adobe Lightroom and VSCO, as well as the AI photo-enhancing software Remini.

“The hardest part of the creative process for me is making the image feel ‘real’ to me,” Yesiltas wrote about his passion project. “The moment I like the most is when I think the image in front of me looks as if it was taken by a photographer.”

Yesiltas’ meticulousness paid off, because the results are uncanny.

Along with each photo, Yesiltas writes a bittersweet message “wishing” how things might have gone differently … as if nothing happened.
Keep ReadingShow less
All images provided by Adewole Adamson

It begins with more inclusive conversations at a patient level

True

Adewole Adamson, MD, of the University of Texas, Austin, aims to create more equity in health care by gathering data from more diverse populations by using artificial intelligence (AI), a type of machine learning. Dr. Adamson’s work is funded by the American Cancer Society (ACS), an organization committed to advancing health equity through research priorities, programs and services for groups who have been marginalized.

Melanoma became a particular focus for Dr. Adamson after meeting Avery Smith, who lost his wife—a Black woman—to the deadly disease.

melanoma,  melanoma for dark skin Avery Smith (left) and Adamson (sidenote)

This personal encounter, coupled with multiple conversations with Black dermatology patients, drove Dr. Adamson to a concerning discovery: as advanced as AI is at detecting possible skin cancers, it is heavily biased.

To understand this bias, it helps to first know how AI works in the early detection of skin cancer, which Dr. Adamson explains in his paper for the New England Journal of Medicine (paywall). The process uses computers that rely on sets of accumulated data to learn what healthy or unhealthy skin looks like and then create an algorithm to predict diagnoses based on those data sets.

This process, known as supervised learning, could lead to huge benefits in preventive care.

After all, early detection is key to better outcomes. The problem is that the data sets don’t include enough information about darker skin tones. As Adamson put it, “everything is viewed through a ‘white lens.’”

“If you don’t teach the algorithm with a diverse set of images, then that algorithm won’t work out in the public that is diverse,” writes Adamson in a study he co-wrote with Smith (according to a story in The Atlantic). “So there’s risk, then, for people with skin of color to fall through the cracks.”

Tragically, Smith’s wife was diagnosed with melanoma too late and paid the ultimate price for it. And she was not an anomaly—though the disease is more common for White patients, Black cancer patients are far more likely to be diagnosed at later stages, causing a notable disparity in survival rates between non-Hispanics whites (90%) and non-Hispanic blacks (66%).

As a computer scientist, Smith suspected this racial bias and reached out to Adamson, hoping a Black dermatologist would have more diverse data sets. Though Adamson didn’t have what Smith was initially looking for, this realization ignited a personal mission to investigate and reduce disparities.

Now, Adamson uses the knowledge gained through his years of research to help advance the fight for health equity. To him, that means not only gaining a wider array of data sets, but also having more conversations with patients to understand how socioeconomic status impacts the level and efficiency of care.

“At the end of the day, what matters most is how we help patients at the patient level,” Adamson told Upworthy. “And how can you do that without knowing exactly what barriers they face?”

american cancer society, skin cacner treatment"What matters most is how we help patients at the patient level."https://www.kellydavidsonstudio.com/

The American Cancer Society believes everyone deserves a fair and just opportunity to prevent, find, treat, and survive cancer—regardless of how much money they make, the color of their skin, their sexual orientation, gender identity, their disability status, or where they live. Inclusive tools and resources on the Health Equity section of their website can be found here. For more information about skin cancer, visit cancer.org/skincancer.

via Dion Merrick / Facebook

This article originally appeared on 02.09.21


At 1:30 am on Monday morning an AMBER Alert went out in southern Louisiana about a missing 10-year-old girl from New Iberia. It was believed she had been kidnapped and driven away in a 2012 silver Nissan Altima.

A few hours later at 7 am, Dion Merrick and Brandon Antoine, sanitation workers for Pelican Waste, were on their daily route when they noticed a vehicle that fit the description in the alert.

Keep ReadingShow less
Joy

Nurse turns inappropriate things men say in the delivery room into ‘inspirational’ art

"Can you move to the birthing ball so I can sleep in the bed?"

Holly the delivery nurse.

After working six years as a labor and delivery nurse Holly, 30, has heard a lot of inappropriate remarks made by men while their partners are in labor. “Sometimes the moms think it’s funny—and if they think it’s funny, then I’ll laugh with them,” Holly told TODAY Parents. “But if they get upset, I’ll try to be the buffer. I’ll change the subject.”

Some of the comments are so wrong that she did something creative with them by turning them into “inspirational” quotes and setting them to “A Thousand Miles” by Vanessa Carlton on TikTok.

“Some partners are hard to live up to!” she jokingly captioned the video.

Keep ReadingShow less