Art students made 100 beautiful popsicles. What's inside them is horrifying.

Don't eat these popsicles.

Just, just don't. All images via Hung I-chen, used with permission.

Hung I-chen, Guo Yi-hui, and Cheng Yu-ti, three students from the National Taiwan University of Arts, have created a stunning and frankly icky art project — 100 popsicles, filled to the brim with dirt, trash, and muck.


Pictured: muck.

Water weeds, bottle caps, and slime float in place, frozen like bugs in amber.

There are probably bugs in there too, by the way.

The water for each popsicle was collected from polluted sites right on the island.

Not grape-flavored.

The samples came from a hundred different lakes, rivers, and beaches, lending each creation a unique flavor, like "New Huwei Creek" or "Large Ditch in Tianwei." The water samples were first frozen, then recreated in polyester resin. Each was given a custom wrapper.

Ah yes, "Ditch" — my favorite.

The project, simply titled "Polluted Water Popsicles," was made in response to a rise in water pollution throughout Taiwan.

Taiwan's rapid economic growth and urbanization has revolutionized the country, but it also has led to a rise in pollution and trash as well. A lot of that ends up in lakes and streams. The students told Quartz they hope this will raise people's awareness of the problem.

Since its debut, the project's gone viral. They've even made it into an art exhibition in Taipei.

Water pollution is a serious problem, and it's important to take action.

It looks like someone dumped a lint trap in there.

Remember to watch where your garbage goes, support environmental organizations, and, if you're looking for the perfect summer field trip, maybe check out a local river or beach cleanup event.

When you're done, you can reward yourself with a popsicle. A real one. Just make sure that wrapper gets where it needs to go — a recycling or garbage can.

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