The Rock shared his eulogy from his dad's funeral, and we dare you to not cry

The Rock isn't as hard as his name would suggest. In fact, he can even move us to tears. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson recently took to Instagram to share the eulogy he gave at his father's funeral last month. His father, Rocky "Soul Man" Johnson, suffered a heart attack at the age of 75. His eulogy is relatable to anyone who'd loved and lost. "Man, I wish I had … I wish I had one more shot," Johnson began. "I wish I had one more shot to say goodbye … to say I love you, to say thank you, but I have a feeling he's watching. He's listening."



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Johnson revealed how he felt when he found out his father passed while he was on his way to work. "You know how you have those moments where you try and shake yourself out of it, and you're like 'No, it's not a dream. … My dad's gone,'" he said. "In that moment, I just thought 'Well, what do I need to do? What's the next thing that I need to do?'" he said. "And I heard a voice say, 'Well, hey, the show must go on,' and that was my dad. That was my old man who told me that."



Johnson also spoke about his father's legacy. His father debuted as a wrestler in 1966, and in 2008, he was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame by Johnson. Rocky Johnson paved the way for other black wrestlers, and was the first black wrestler to win the World Tag Team Championship.

"[W]hen somebody is a trailblazer that means that they actually, they have the ability to change behavior and audience's behavior, people's behavior," Johnson said in his eulogy. "And for my dad, when he broke into the business in the mid '60s and throughout the late '60s and into the '70s in the United States where racial tension and divide was very strong. In the '60s and the '70s, you have a Black man coming in, it's an all-white audience and all these small little towns that eventually I would go on to wrestle in — but at that time he changed the audience's behavior and actually had them cheer for this Black man."

"And not when he was wrestling against other Black men, 'cause he was usually the only Black guy in the territory, he was wrestling against other white wrestlers," Jonson continued. When you think of my dad's name, you think 'hard work.' You think 'barrier-breaking,' you think being the hardest worker in the room, always working out. He taught me how to work out at a very young age. Hard work, discipline — those are things and tenants that are synonymous with my dad's name."

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Johnson closed his eulogy with a message that we can all follow, even if we haven't lost a loved one. "Guaranteed when we walk out of these doors, we're going to hold each other a bit tighter, we're going to hug each other a bit harder, we're going to kiss each other and we're going to say, 'I love you,'" he said. "And we're going to be a bit more present."

Johnson's message was moving, and it's important to remember to love your loved ones while you have them around.

We're not crying. That? Oh, that's just something in our eye.

Researchers at Harvard University have studied the connection between spanking and kids' brain development for the first time, and their findings echo what studies have indicated for years: Spanking isn't good for children.

Comments on this article will no doubt be filled with people who a) say they were spanked and "turned out fine" or b) say that the reason kids are [fill in the blank with some societal ill] these days are because they aren't spanked. However, a growing body of research points to spanking creating more problems than it solves.

"We know that children whose families use corporal punishment are more likely to develop anxiety, depression, behavior problems, and other mental health problems, but many people don't think about spanking as a form of violence," said Katie A. McLaughlin, director of the Stress & Development Lab in the Department of Psychology, and the senior researcher on the study which was published Friday in the journal Child Development. "In this study, we wanted to examine whether there was an impact of spanking at a neurobiological level, in terms of how the brain is developing."

You can read the entire study here, but the gist is that kids' brain activity was measured using an MRI machine as they reacted to photos of actors displaying "fearful" and "neutral" faces. What researchers found was that kids who had been spanked had similar brain neural responses to fearful faces as kids who had been abused.

"There were no regions of the brain where activation to fearful relative to neutral faces differed between children who were abused and children who were spanked," the authors wrote in a statement.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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