Dominos Pizza is giving away free pizza to women named Karen who aren't "Karens"

Movies. Clothing stores. The big company potluck. Karens have ruined so much for us. The name "Karen" was one of the top 10 names for girls born in the United States during the 1950s and 1960s, peaking as the third most popular girl's name in 1965. This means that most Karens we know are middle-aged or older — and we can all imagine that wrinkled face and short, highlighted hair. They've taken so much from the world — but one hero is trying to give some of that back.

Domino's Australia has offered to give pizza to anyone named "Karen" who isn't a "Karen". The company said in a Facebook post: "CALLING ALL (MASK WEARING, LAW ABIDING) KARENS. It's a tough time to be a Karen."



"Karen the nurse, Karen the teacher, Karen the mum, Karen the neighbour, Karen the mask wearer — we're all in this together, but a vocal minority who believe rules and laws don't apply to them have given the name "Karen" a bad rap this year".

"At Domino's, we know there's plenty of Australians named Karen that aren't, well, "Karens". Let us know if you're one of them by completing the form via the link below. We may send some pizza your way!"

The post is full of comments from people named "Karen", actual "Karens", and grateful citizens alike, and the Domino's Australia team has been putting in some serious work with their funny replies (one comment from them says that their pizza is a better cure than therapy for PKSD, or "post Karen stress disorder"). We'll just have to wait and see (and hope, and pray) if this juicy offer makes any Karens out there tone down the anger. One thing is clear though: they can take our liberty, they can take our manager, but they'll never take away our pizza.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.