Burger King is doing the unthinkable and openly asking people to buy food from McDonald's
via Chris / Flickr

The United Kingdom isn't the first place most people consider when thinking about the burger wars. However, McDonald's and Burger King have developed a tense rivalry in the UK since they set up shop across the pond in the mid-'70s.

Currently, McDonald's is the top-ranked fast-food chain in the UK with around £2 billion ($2.58 billion) in annual sales. Burger King is the second most popular burger joint with around £600 million ($774 million).

But in light of a major spike in COVID-19 cases, Burger King is calling a temporary truce and asking people to buy a Big Mac to help keep people employed. On Saturday, UK Prime Minister Boris Jonson announced a month-long lockdown in England to help stop the spread of the coronavirus.



So, Burger King extended an olive branch to its arch-rival on Twitter Monday with a statement titled, "Order at McDonald's.'"

"Just like we never thought we'd be encouraging you to order from KFC, Subway, Domino's Pizza, Pizza Hut, Five Guys, Greggs, Taco Bell, Papa John's, Leon... or any of the other independent food outlets, too numerous to mention here," the statement reads.

"In short, from any of our sister food chains (fast or not so fast). We never thought we'd be asking you to do this, but restaurants employing thousands of staff really need your support at the moment," the statement continues.

"So, if you want to help, keep treating yourself to tasty meals through home delivery, takeaway or drive-thru. Getting a Whopper is always best, but ordering a Big Mac is also not such a bad thing," the statement concludes.

via Burger King UK

The statement is as unbelievable as Coke urging you to buy a Pepsi. Or the Republican Party suggesting you vote for Joe Biden. But these are tough times in the UK and abroad, so Burger King is taking a moment to bury the hatchet in support of the loyal opposition.

The month-long lockdown will begin on Thursday, November 5, and extend until December 2. Under the new restrictions pubs, bars, and restaurants will be closed except for takeout and delivery.

The UK recently surpassed over 1 million total cases of COVID-19 with deaths rising to over 46,000. The country of 59 million reported a daily high of 26,7070 infections on October 21.

"The modeling presented by our scientists suggests that without action we could see up to twice as many deaths over the winter as we saw in the first wave," Johnson said in Parliament on Monday. "Faced with these latest figures, there is no alternative but to take further action at a national level."

One of the reasons cited for England's huge uptick in COVID-19 cases is Johnson's "Eat Out to Help Out" program launched in the summer. The program encouraged people to visit restaurants by paying people's bills up to £10 pounds per meal every Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday in August.

Diners could choose whether to eat indoors or outdoors and masks weren't required.

UK health officials were horrified by the idea of encouraging people to eat indoors during a pandemic. Although there's no concrete data that links the program directly to the recent surge in the virus, Toby Phillips, head of research and policy at Oxford University's Pathways for Prosperity Commission, says it's hard to deny the connection.

"Looking at the English regions, there is a loose correlation between uptake of the scheme and new cases in the last weeks of August," Phillips wrote in The Conversation. "Again, this isn't to say that the scheme caused those cases. But it certainly didn't discourage those people from going out."

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less
via The Walt Disney Company / Flickr

One of the ways to tell if you're in a healthy relationship is whether you and your partner are free to talk about other people you find attractive. For many couples, bringing up such a sensitive topic can cause some major jealousy.

Of course, there's a healthy way to approach such a potentially dangerous topic.

Telling your partner you find someone else attractive shouldn't be about making them feel jealous. It's probably also best that if you're attracted to a coworker, friend, or their sibling, that you keep it to yourself.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less