Amazing photos of senior competitive track stars with all the right moves

They're athletes from all around the world — agile, limber, and fluid.

A long jumper in the 80-84 division. Photo by Angela Jimenez, used with permission.


They move with grace and lightning speed, the wind in their hair ... or not.

Golden Bertram started sprinting at 55 years old. Here he is in 2007, at 65. Photo by Angela Jimenez, used with permission.

They are the senior competitors of Masters Track and Field.

Masters offers athletes ages 30 and older the opportunity to compete in track and field events.

These athletes are informally known as the "retirement division," but don't be fooled — they have no plans to slow down.

Pengxue Xu, the only decathlete in the 85-89 division. Photo by Angela Jimenez, used with permission.

Photographer Angela Jimenez captures these athletes in her project, "Racing Age."

A former athlete herself, Jimenez competed on the track team for the University of Pennsylvania in 1990s. She was drawn back to the track in 2007, when she heard about a Masters meet in Kentucky.

"I want it to be this beautiful homage to these athletes and their bodies."

In an interview with Upworthy, Jimenez described the stereotype disruption she hopes to create with her work: "To see someone who's 80, who's in the starting blocks with this look of absolute determination, in what you perceive to be a body that should be sitting in a rocking chair? It's really jarring. It's really paradigm shifting. That's what keeps me going back to photograph this."

The starting line of the women's 100 meter, 80-84 division. Photo by Angela Jimenez, used with permission.

Unlike in traditional sports photography, where speed is everything, Jimenez shoots on a manual camera.

Her Hasselblad film camera has no light meter, no autofocus, and only 12 shots per roll of film, a drastic change from the digital SLR cameras she's accustomed to using. And while Jimenez herself says the manual method can be kind of a pain, it's the perfect fit for this project.

David Yepa Sr. competes in the 1500 meter at age 74. Photo by Angela Jimenez, used with permission.

With the slower camera and fewer frames, she has to plan ahead and be more deliberate in what shots she tries to capture. She explained, "I want it to be this beautiful homage to these athletes and their bodies."

Male decathletes at the starting line for the 1500. Photo by Angela Jimenez, used with permission.

In her years shooting "Racing Age," Jimenez has gathered plenty of insight about living well from her subjects.

As she learned in her years of photography and personal interviews, few of the senior athletes come to compete at Masters as former track stars or even as lifelong athletes.

"They don't all have the same story, especially women and especially people of color. Women who came up before Title IX and people who grew up in segregation," Jimenez said. "They haven't had all the privileges of being an athlete since they were six and doing it their whole lives."

But while their athletic origins vary, many of the athletes share a fierce competitive streak, avoid alcohol and junk food, and have a positive outlook.

Joann and Barbara are sprinters in the 70-74 division. Photo by Angela Jimenez, used with permission.

Now she hopes to share their wisdom and athleticism with the world.

Jimenez is running a Kickstarter campaign to turn "Racing Age" into a hardcover photography book, complete with interviews. She also hopes to one day tour with the project and change the narrative around senior citizens, ageism, and how we treat our elders.

Johnnye Valien is a thrower in the women's 80-84 division. Photo by Angela Jimenez, used with permission.

"I ... always wanted this book to be about putting ... positive ... stereotype-disruptive imagery out, where older people can benefit," Jimenez said.

And from the looks of it, they won't be the only ones.

See more of Jimenez's photos in this video for the "Racing Age" Kickstarter campaign:

Motherhood is a journey unlike any other, and one that is nearly impossible to prepare for. No matter how many parenting books you read, how many people you talk to, how many articles you peruse before having kids, your children will emerge as completely unique creatures who impact your world in ways you could never have anticipated.

Those of us who have been parenting for a while have some wisdom to share from experience. Not that older moms know everything, of course, but hindsight can offer some perspective that's hard to find when you're in the thick of early motherhood.

Upworthy asked our readers who are moms what they wish they could tell their younger selves about motherhood, and the responses were both honest and wholesome. Here's what they said:

Lighten up. Don't sweat the small stuff.

One of the most common responses was to stop worrying about the little things so much, try to be present with your kids, and enjoy the time you have with them:

"Relax and enjoy them. If your house is a mess, so be it. Stay in the moment as they are temporary..more so than you think, sometimes. We lost our beautiful boy to cancer 15+yrs ago. I loved him more than life itself..💔 "- Janet

"Don't worry about the dishes, laundry and other chores. Read the kids another book. Go outside and make a mud pie. Throw the baseball around a little longer. Color another picture. Take more pictures and make sure you are in the pictures too! My babies are 19 and 17 and I would give anything to relive an ordinary Saturday from 15 years ago." - Emma H.

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The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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