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upworthy

new york city

Brielle Asero lost her job after 2 months.

TikTokker Brielle Asero, 21, a recent college graduate, went viral on TikTok in October for her emotional reaction to the first day at a 9-to-5 job. The video, which received 3.4 million views, captured the public’s attention because it was like a cultural Rorschach test.

Some who saw the video thought that Asero came off as entitled and exemplified the younger generation’s lack of work ethic. In contrast, others sympathized with the young woman who is just beginning to understand how hard it is to find work-life balance in modern-day America.

“I’m so upset,” she says in the video. "I get on the train at 7:30 a.m., and I don't get home until 6:15 p.m. [at the] earliest. I don't have time to do anything!" Asero said in a video.

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Mayor Eric Adams' remarks about "low-skill" workers set off a firestorm of responses.

Sometimes it's surprising how quickly politicians can step in it, even when they're trying to say something legitimately important or helpful.

In trying to convince the public that people who can't work remotely need the support of other New Yorkers during the current wave of COVID-19 infections, New York City Mayor Eric Adams artlessly referred to cooks, messengers, shoe shiners and Dunkin' Donuts employees as "low-skill workers" who "don't have the academic skills to sit in a corner office."

To be fair, he was trying express support for the workers he seems to insult, but it came across all wrong. His remarks set off a firestorm of responses from people who have worked as service workers and who took issue with the idea of those jobs being "low-skill."

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Wrinkle the emotional support duck turned heads at the NYC Marathon.

Well, here's something you don't see every day. Or, um, ever.

The New York City Marathon took place this past Sunday, as 33,000 runners of all shapes and sizes ran the 26.2 miles from Staten Island to Central Park. Among them was a runner no one would have expected—an energetic white duck named Wrinkle.

Wrinkle's owner shared her triumphant running videos on TikTok and YouTube, which highlight Wrinkle's daily doings, and people have been sharing them with great joy on social media. Who can blame them? Ducks are adorable. Ducks in shoes are super adorable. And a duck in shoes running in a marathon is too adorable to handle.

I mean, watch this and try not to smile.

Wrinkle's owner wrote on the video share on YouTube:

Wrinkle the duck is more than just a beautiful pekin duck,

she is a full grown adult human child

She is fast

She is speed

She is zoom

She is wrinkle

Still fast as duck boiiii

The video of Wrinkle running in the marathon has garnered more than 4 million views on TikTok and thousands of comments.

One commenter wrote, "I know this may seem silly, but I've been so deeply depressed lately and seeing this little lady running has actually made me smile."

Wrinkle responded: "As an official emotional support duck hearing this makes me feel like I'm doing my job well. Wrinkle loves you."

Some famous brands got in on the comments as well.

Duolingo—the language app with an owl for an icon—wrote, "That's my cousin!"

Adidas wrote, "Sending this to our design team to petition for a new duck shoe collection."

The New York Rangers hockey team wrote, "She's a runner, she's a track star" (a reference to the song "Track Star"—of course, several commenters chimed in to correct it to "quack star").

Peloton wrote, "You're hired your first class will be a 20 min Hip Hop Waddle."

The Anaheim Ducks hockey team: "Legendary duck."

(Aflac, surprisingly, missed the opportunity.)

Undoubtedly, Wrinkle did not run the entire 26.2 miles, but however much she ran was totally worth it. If you're wondering how Wrinkle trained for her five minutes of fame, check this out (with the sound up, please):

@seducktiv

Duck Feet on Hardwood Floors 🧀 #oddlysatisfying #narutorun #zoomies #asmrsounds #wrinkletheduck #foryou

Okay, wrinkle. You've won us over with your cute widdle waddle and the pitter patter of your widdle footsies. The shoes are really just icing on the cake.

In a world filled with division and strife, perhaps we can all agree on the delight Wrinkle the emotional support duck brings to us all.

Follow Wrinkle's adventures on TikTok and YouTube.

Photo by tom coe on Unsplash

UPDATE: Back in early June NYC reported zero coronavirus deaths, a number that unfortunately was updated as new information came in. This latest update appears to represent a more certain statistic. Even if there's an adjustment, it's clear that New York City has made an incredible evolution from the world's epicenter of the virus to one that has become America's shining light for paving a path forward to all other major cities and locales in how to combat this deadly disease.

According to Bloomberg News, NYC coronavirus deaths peaked at 799 in one day back on April 9th.

"New Yorkers have been the hero of this story, going above and beyond to keep each other safe," City Hall spokeswoman Avery Cohen said in a statement emailed to Bloomberg.

Original story begins below:

New York State reported five deaths statewide on Sunday but didn't specify where those fatalities occurred. The highest number of deaths statewide was reported on April 9, at 799.

New York City has reported a total of 18,670 confirmed Covid-19 deaths and 4,613 probable ones.On Wednesday, for the first time since early March, New York City logged its first day with zero confirmed deaths from COVID-19. For a city that became the nation's biggest coronavirus hotspot by far, with a daily peak of 590 deaths on April 7, that's wonderful news.

There is one caveat, though. According to the New York Daily News, records released by the city showed three "probable" deaths from the virus, which may very well end up being confirmed. Even at that, though, the milestone of zero confirmed deaths in a 24-hour period was met with celebration by officials in the city, which has seen nearly 17,000 confirmed deaths and more than 4,700 probable deaths in the past three months.

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