11 priceless photos a new mom took of her napping baby.

Parenting is hard. Dressing up your baby like Eleven from 'Stranger Things' when they're out cold makes it easier.

When Laura Izumikawa was pregnant with her daughter, Joey, her friends who had kids warned her life as she knew it would change once Joey was born.

In some ways, this was true. After Joey was born, Laura's stress levels rose, and her "me time" diminished significantly.

Parents know this is just par for the course — new motherhood comes with all sorts of worries and responsibilities. Often the only time moms have a moment to decompress is during those precious few hours of nap time.


A #CheeriosChallenge went down.

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

While many take that time to catch a few more winks themselves, Laura decided to do something a little different.

Outside of her new mom life, Laura is a professional photographer who specializes in taking photos of couples, weddings, families, and kids. Secondarily, she was blessed with a daughter who's an incredibly heavy sleeper.

So she decided to put her photography skills and her daughter's sleeping skills together to create some adorable works of art to commemorate Joey's infancy and ultimately unwind from the stresses of new parenthood.  

It started out as just a fun way to update her grandparents on how much Joey is growing.

Long hair don't care. She's ready to eat.🍴

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

Then her friends asked her to put the photos on Instagram, and the rest as they say, is cute, hilarious history.

1. She's been a tourist on Hawaii.

It's only Monday and I'm dreaming of #Hawaii 🌺

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

2. And won a gold medal in her sleep.

What the best exercise for a swimmer? Pool-ups. 🏊🏼 #rio2016

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

So how does Laura do all this without waking her baby? Simple, she does the arm flinch test to make sure Joey's totally out, then, ever so carefully, starts to put props around her.

"The most important thing for me is not to disturb her sleep or make her feel uncomfortable at all," wrote Laura in an email.

She does pop music icons like:

3. The fierce Beyoncé.

All the single babies! 💍 #Beyonce

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

4. Sia in her famous eye-hiding wig.

Didn't have a chandelier but I did find a wig. 👩🏼🎤#Sia

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

5. Slash from Guns and Roses.

Sha na na na na na na na knees knees 🎩🔫🌹 #gunsnroses #notinthislifetime

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

And she does spot-on fictional characters, too.

6. Furiosa from "Mad Max: Fury Road."

Oh, what a day. What a lovely day! 🌪🚛 #Furiosa

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

7. The lost, but not forgotten Barb from "Stranger Things."

In loving memory. #StrangerThings

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

8. Leia from "Star Wars" with her dad.

Hey, I just met you, and this is crazy. But I'm your father, so join me maybe. #starwars

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

9. "It's Wayne's World! Wayne's World! Party time! Excellent!"

Party on Wayne. Party on Garth. 🤘🏻#waynesworld

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

10. "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to ... (snores)."

11. "The hills are alive..."

🎶How do you solve a problem like Maria? #soundofmusic

A photo posted by Laura Izumikawa (@lauraiz) on

At the end of the day, parenting can be exhausting. If you can find a way to smile or laugh through it, you're doing pretty great.

"I've found joy in slowing down and watching her grow," wrote Laura. "With these photos, playing with Joey, watching her slowly drift to sleep and dressing her up in hilarious outfits showed me that parenting can be fun and enjoyable."

It's all about finding a special way to bond, whether or not that includes props and wardrobe changes.

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