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Health

Meet the world’s first biodegradable plant-based face mask


The G95 Oceanshield was designed to protect you and the environment.

Meet the world’s first biodegradable plant-based face mask
Image via Oceanshield

The G95 Oceanshield was designed to protect you and the environment.

The Covid-19 pandemic has certainly given us plenty to worry about, from life threatening illness and social isolation, to economic turmoil and disrupted work and school routines. Now scientists are saying we also have to worry about the environmental impact of the pandemic, because it turns out that toxins from single-use masks are poisoning the world’s water. Luckily, a company called G95 has just released an N95-type mask called the Oceanshield that is completely biodegradable. And it could be a total gamechanger.



According to the latest estimates, global consumption of single-use plastics has risen 300% now that the world is going through about 129 billion face masks per month.

How much is 129 billion masks per month? It’s 3 million masks per minute, or 14.4 million pounds of medical waste per day. And because we’re producing all this waste, scientists are finding unprecedented levels of microplastics and nanoplastics in the world’s waterways.

Microplastics are particles of plastic less than 5 millimeters long that are created by the degradation of plastic waste. These particles are extremely harmful for the environment, especially in aquatic ecosystems, but they don’t necessarily post a direct threat to human beings. But nanoplastics are another story. These particles are less than a millimeter long, and some are actually small enough to pass through cell walls and damage DNA. Some scientists even describe them as “tiny carcinogenic bombs” that threaten all forms of life on a cellular level.Environmental Impact Of Covid-19

Image via Unsplash

Scientists in Canada and the UK have been studying what happens to maks when they’re thrown out, and their findings are not good. When a single mask is exposed to water and UV light, it can produce as many as 1.5 million particles.

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The G95 Oceanshield can protect you AND the environment.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like Covid-19 is going away any time soon. However, thanks to the G95 Oceanshield mask, there is something you can do about the environmental impact of the pandemic.

The Oceanshield mask is the world’s first single-use face mask made entirely from plant-based materials. And when we say entirely, we mean everything from the ear loops, to the nose bridge, to the cutting edge G95 filtration technology. Development of the Oceanshield’s cutting edge filtration material actually began before the pandemic. However, when Covid struck, G95 kicked development into overdrive to get this life-changing product on the market.

Because the Oceanshield is made from plant-based materials, it will biodegrade in about 90 days. However, that doesn’t mean you have to throw them in the trash. When you purchase Oceanshield masks you are automatically enrolled in G95’s return system, which lets you send used masks back to G95 so they can be recycled. And this program isn’t just free. They’ll actually pay you! For every used Oceanshield you send back, you’ll get $1 store credit. For any other used mask you send back, you’ll get a $.25 store credit. Those are savings that can add up pretty fast.

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Protection you can trust.Of course, Oceanshields aren’t just great for the environment. They will also keep you safe from Covid. These FFP2-rated masks have 99% PFE, BFE, and VFE filtration and are KN95 certified. Short of getting fit-tested for an actual N95 mask, this is as good as it gets.

If the thought of throwing one more medical mask in the garbage makes you sick, but you still want more protection than a cloth mask, the Oceanshield is the perfect solution. Order yours today and do your part to stop the spread of Covid-19 and toxic plastic waste.


Nature

Pennsylvania home is the entrance to a cave that’s been closed for 70 years

You can only access the cave from the basement of the home and it’s open for business.

This Pennsylvania home is the entrance to a cave.

Have you ever seen something in a movie or online and thought, "That's totally fake," only to find out it's absolutely a real thing? That's sort of how this house in Pennsylvania comes across. It just seems too fantastical to be real, and yet somehow it actually exists.

The home sits between Greencastle and Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, and houses a pretty unique public secret. There's a cave in the basement. Not a man cave or a basement that makes you feel like you're in a cave, but an actual cave that you can't get to unless you go through the house.

Turns out the cave was discovered in the 1830s on the land of John Coffey, according to Uncovering PA, but the story of how it was found is unclear. People would climb down into the cave to explore occasionally until the land was leased about 100 years later and a small structure was built over the cave opening.

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Health

This company makes it easier than ever to enjoy guilt-free fairly traded coffee

Thanks to Lifeboost, good coffee can be good for everyone.

Unsplash

Lifeboost coffee

Americans love coffee. Like, we really, seriously, truly love it. According to one recent survey, 75 percent of U.S. adults drink coffee at least occasionally, while 53 percent—about 110 million people—drink it every single day. For some, coffee is an essential part of their morning ritual. For others, it’s something they enjoy when they hit the proverbial wall in the late afternoon. But either way, millions of people use coffee to boost energy, focus, and productivity.


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Pop Culture

13-year-old ventriloquist sings incredible, sassy version of 'You Don't Own Me' on 'AGT'

Ana-Maria Mărgean only started her hobby in 2020 and is already wowing audiences on "America's Got Talent."

America's Got Talent/Youtube

Ana-Maria Mărgean singing "You Don't Own Me" on "America's Got Talent"

It’s not every day a ventriloquist act is so jaw-dropping that it has to be seen to be believed. But when it does happen, it’s usually on “America’s Got Talent.”

Ana-Maria Mărgean was only 11 years old when she first took to the stage on “Romania’s Got Talent” to show off her ventriloquism skills, an act inspired by videos of fellow ventriloquist and “America’s Got Talent” Season 2 champion Terry Fator.

Using puppets built for her by her parents, the young performer tirelessly spent her quarantine time in 2020 learning how to bring them to life, which led to her receiving a Golden Buzzer and eventually winning the entire series in Romania.

Mărgean is now 13 and a competitor on this season of “America’s Got Talent: All-Stars,” hoping to be crowned the winner and perform her own show in Vegas, just like her hero Fator.

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Pop Culture

Linda Ronstadt's 1970's ballad is a chart-topping hit once again thanks to 'The Last of Us'

The iconic 70s song "Long, Long Time" was an integral part of an unforgettable episode that fans are calling a masterpiece.

Linda Ronstadt (left), Nick Offerman and Murray Bartlett (right)

HBO’s emotional third episode of the zombie series “The Last Of Us” became an instant favorite among fans, thanks in no small part to Linda Ronstadt’s late 1970s ballad, “Long, Long Time.”

Using the song as the episode’s title, “Long, Long Time,” moves away from the show’s main plot to instead focus on a heartbreakingly beautiful love story between Bill (Nick Offerman) and Frank (Murray Bartlett), from its endearing start all the way to its bittersweet end.

The song makes its first appearance during the initial stages of Bill and Frank’s romance as they play the tune on the piano, just before they share their first kiss.

We see their entire lives together play out—one of closeness, devotion, and savoring homegrown strawberries—until they meet their end. The song then plays on the radio, bringing the bottle episode to a poignant close.

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Joy

34-year-old man is learning to read on TikTok in series of motivational videos

His reading skills have improved so much that he plans to read 100 books this year.

@oliverspeaks1/TikTok

Oliver James is the biggest star on BookTok.

With over 125,000 followers, 34-year-old Oliver James is a star in the BookTok community. And it all started with a very simple goal: Learn to read.

For most kids, school is a place where they can develop a relationship with learning in a safe environment. For James, school was the opposite. Growing up with learning and behavior disabilities subjected him to abusive teaching practices in special education, which, of course, did nothing to help.

"The special education system at the time was more focused on behavioral than educating," he told Good Morning America. "So they spent a lotta time restraining us, a lotta time disciplining us, a lotta times putting us in positions to kinda shape us to just not act out in class."

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Pop Culture

Buffy Sainte-Marie shares what led to her openly breastfeeding on 'Sesame Street' in 1977

The way she explained to Big Bird what she was doing is still an all-time great example.

"Sesame Street" taught kids about life in addition to letters and numbers.

In 1977, singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie did something revolutionary: She fed her baby on Sesame Street.

The Indigenous Canadian-Ameican singer-songwriter wasn't doing anything millions of other mothers hadn't done—she was simply feeding her baby. But the fact that she was breastfeeding him was significant since breastfeeding in the United States hit an all-time low in 1971 and was just starting to make a comeback. The fact that she did it openly on a children's television program was even more notable, since "What if children see?" has been a key pearl clutch for people who criticize breastfeeding in public.

But the most remarkable thing about the "Sesame Street" segment was the lovely interchange between Big Bird and Sainte-Marie when he asked her what she was doing.

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