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Joy

10 things that made us smile this week

Upworthy's weekly roundup of joy and delight from around the internet.

elyse myers, dancing

Hilarious humans, cute doggos, delightful dancing and more to bring some joy to your day.

Ah, June. The month of graduations, weddings and summer break. Definitely one of the top three months of the year for joy.

It's also a month to celebrate liberation, as Juneteenth and Pride remind us that all humans deserve to be free from oppression and that the inalienable rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness belong to each and every one of us.

June means outdoor fun as well. Barbecues. Picnics. The weather in June is usually delightful as the days get longer and stretch well into the evening. By summer solstice, we'll still see the sun's rays at 9:30 p.m. where I live. All of that light makes bedtime a little tricky for the kids, but who cares. Long summer evenings are the stuff childhood memories are made of.


Yes, June is good.

This week's roundup reflects a bit of June's joy. We have heartwarming graduation stories, some delightful dancing, some cute doggos (of course) and some humans being hilarious. So whether you're heading out for a weekend of fun or holed up in COVID isolation (yes, we're still spreading that stuff around), take a few minutes and enjoy these snippets of delight.

1. High school grads showed up at their kindergarten teacher's house to surprise her.

@kimhamilton15

#kindergartentograduation

They were the last class she taught before she retired. She was so proud. We don't deserve teachers. Read the story here.

2. Speaking of pride, check out this sweet mama doggo and her new pups.

That wink, though.

3. And speaking of PRIDE … and doggos … introducing Riley the accidental ally.

"This is Riley. He fell asleep on some chalk and woke up an LGBTQ+ icon. Not washing it off all month. 14/10.”

We Rate Dogs is nothing but joy, BTW. And speaking of joy…

4. These gentlemen each doing their own two-step can just be played on repeat all day long.

@ceceredqueen01

Everyone don’t 2 Step the same ya dig 👑 #gala #mendance🕺😁🤣 #2022 #footwork #fyp

The suits. The hats. The smooth, expressive enjoyment of it all. All day, all day.

5. And in a whole other dance genre, these text tone dance moves are just tight.

Clever and well-executed. (Popcorn and Anticipate are my faves.)

6. Apparently, it's possible to use Instagram only as an ice cream flavor checker.

While we all struggle to not constantly get sucked into social media, Rachel's husband is out here living a whole life, only checking ice cream flavors on Instagram once a month.

How, Rachel's husband? How???

7. Try not to smile while watching babies smile at Borzah's smile.

"White Smile Borzah" making babies smile

​Nah, don't try. Just go with it. No sense in resisting. He even got one kid to go from crying to smiling in 10 seconds! (Read the full story here.)

8. Master storyteller Elyse Myers shares a hilarious tale about "edible" wedding plates.

@elysemyers

Turns out, it was as weird as I thought it was. 🍮 #coffeetalk #ecofriendly

No one tells a story like Elyse Myers, but this one is particularly hilarious. How did she not just die? Read more about her here.

9. Dad drove halfway across the country to surprise his son for his fifth grade graduation.

Oof. This one's a doozy. So much love.

10. Let's all pocket a bit of whatever this tee-baller's got.

Is that hisjam or what? I love that they basically had to turn it off to get him to pick up the bat. And then he went straight back to ballin.' Total icon.

Hope that brought some happiness to your heart. Come back next Friday for another roundup of smileworthy finds from around the internet!

Marlon Brando and Sacheen Littlefeather.

Nearly 50 years after Sacheen Littlefeather endured boos and abusive jokes at the Academy Awards, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is issuing a formal apology. In 1973, Littlefeather refused Marlon Brando's Best Actor Oscar on his behalf for his iconic role in “The Godfather” at the ceremony to protest the film industry’s treatment of Native Americans.

She explained that Brando "very regretfully cannot accept this very generous award, the reasons for this being … the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee."

Littlefeather is a Native American civil rights activist who was born to a Native American (Apache and Yaqui) father and a European American mother.

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via Pixabay

A father cradling his infant son.

It's almost impossible to be handed a baby and not immediately break into baby talk. In fact, it seems incredibly strange to even consider talking to a baby like one would an adult. Studies have shown that babies prefer baby talk, too.

Researchers from Stanford found that babies prefer to be spoken to in baby talk or “parentese” as scientists refer to the sing-songy cooing we do when talking to infants.

“Often parents are discouraged from using baby talk by well-meaning friends or even health professionals,” Michael Frank, a Stanford psychologist, told Stanford News. “But the evidence suggests that it’s actually a great way to engage with your baby because babies just like it–it tells them, ‘This speech is meant for you!’”

The big question that has eluded scientists is whether parentese is a universal language or varies by culture.

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Bobby McFerrin demonstrated the power of the pentatonic scale without saying a word.

Bobby McFerrin is best known for his hit song “Don’t Worry Be Happy,” which showcased his one-man vocal and body percussion skills (and got stuck in our heads for years). But his musicality extends far beyond the catchy pop tune that made him a household name. The things he can do with his voice are unmatched and his range of musical styles and genres is impressive.

The Kennedy Center describes him: “With a four-octave range and a vast array of vocal techniques, Bobby McFerrin is no mere singer; he is music's last true Renaissance man, a vocal explorer who has combined jazz, folk and a multitude of world music influences - choral, a cappella, and classical music - with his own ingredients.”

McFerrin is also a music educator, and one of his most memorable lessons is a simple, three-minute interactive demonstration in which he doesn’t say a single word.

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