We need hope in our lives. It's what keeps people going when the going gets tough. And since the world is currently literally on fire (and seems like it has been for an entire year – if it's not one part of the world, it's another), some people might need a fresh injection of hope to keep them going.

A recent Pew Research poll found that 56% of Americans are somewhat or very optimistic about the what the country will be like in 2050. And the other 44% now might have something that will lift their spirits.

Scott Hechinger, a public defender in Brooklyn, asked Twitter to share stories that give people hope. "A positive question for this Saturday night," he wrote on Twitter. What, if anything, gives you hope?"

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Dan Rather is a master of dropping truth bombs.

The 86-year-old news legend has been doling out important advice on how to deal with the current state of our world on social media. He had the perfect response to Trump supporters' cries for "civility" and gave the public hope when Justice Kennedy's retirement announcement felt like it might send the U.S. government into an even bigger tailspin.

"Take a deep breath and feel the cool air of hope and justice in your lungs, and then march forward," he wrote at the time.

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'We the People' updates Shepard Fairey's 2008 'Hope' poster for the Trump years.

No matter who is in office, hope and change will always be possible.

Artist Shepard Fairey's "Hope" poster is, perhaps, one of the defining images from the 2008 campaign to elect President Barack Obama.

The image, as ubiquitous in 2008 as Donald Trump's red "Make America Great Again" caps were in 2016, inspired optimism for a world no longer defined by political party. Red and blue, the poster signaled a desire for our politicians to work together for a common good. The global recession had just begun, and it would take teamwork from individuals across the political spectrum to help us recover.

Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images.

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When it comes to sending a message to someone you love, nothing lasts like a letter.

Notes that are written by hand, that we can hold in our own, are so powerful. We can feel the weight of the paper, the texture of the ink, and see the emotion carried through the pen from the hand of the person who wrote it. This is especially true with a message of peace.

Earlier this year, the Paper and Packaging — How Life UnfoldsTM campaign reached out to people across America who had endured unimaginable trauma and cruelty. They survived terrorist attacks, school shootings, and the horrors of human trafficking. One was bullied relentlessly for much of her young life. Another lost a family member to suicide. They faced devastating, life-altering challenges and somehow came out with their faith in humanity intact.

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Letters of Peace