via New York Post

As they say, a dog is a person's best friend. But for someone living on the streets, a dog may be the only real companion they have in the entire world.

Pets are a source of warmth and comfort to those living on the streets and they can also give them a sense of purpose. Dogs can also provided valuable protection on the streets by deterring those who prey on the homeless.

Anthony Rogers, a man experiencing homelessness in Memphis, Tennessee, was heartbroken when his dog, Bobo, went missing for two weeks. Rogers had rescued Bobo when he was a puppy from a drug house and calls him his "lifesaver."

Rogers is an artist who has been drug-free for a year and he credits Bobo as a big reason for his sobriety.

When the dog went missing, Rogers contacted everyone he knew to help find his friend and they plastered the neighborhood with "lost dog" signs.

Luckily, Rogers knew a woman named Emily Ziegler that works at Memphis Animal Services and she recognized Bobo when he was brought into the shelter.

When they were reunited, Rogers and Bobo were ecstatic.

At the pound, Bobo was vaccinated, neutered, and microchipped. It also provided a year's supply of heart worm and flea prevention medication.

"To reunite somebody with a loved animal that has been by his side day-by-day is a rewarding experience, and to know that Bobo will be able to be by his side for the rest of his life," Emily Ziegler, Memphis Animal Services digital administrative clerk, said according to WMC.

"It means a lot to me. He's a good guy and I thank everybody for their time and for watching out for us," Rogers said.

via GoFundMe

After Rogers's story went viral, Rebecca Hinds and John Lewis set up a GoFundMe page to help him get back on his feet. In six weeks it has earned over $13,000.

The donations have helped Rogers and Bobo enter transitional housing while they search for a permanent residence.

According to the GoFundMe page, Rogers's "spirits and self-respect are improving considerably! Bobo, Anthony's dear companion, is in very good health and eating well. Man and dog are so happy to be together again."











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12 News Now

Little Rock, Arkansas has found a unique way of dealing with litter around the city that's not only creating a cleaner community but also helping out the homeless.

In April 2019, the city began a six-month pilot program called Bridge to Work, paying homeless people $9.25 an hour – $2 more than the federal minimum wage – to collect trash off the streets. But it was so successful, Mayor Frank Scott Jr. recently extended through September 2020.

Canvas Community Church runs the program, employing eight people a day to pick up trash, clear weeds, and perform other cleaning tasks in exchange for cash and a meal, according to 12 News Now.

RELATED: Three young siblings started a candle company to pay for video games. Now they're giving back to help the homeless.

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LAPD

Emily Zamourka's life has changed drastically since she was first discovered singing opera in a subway station in Los Angeles.

The 52-year-old, who'd been living on the streets, found overnight fame after an LAPD officer recorded her performance of Giacomo Puccini's "O mio babbino caro" on the platform Sept. 26.

Struck by her incredible voice, the officer captured the moment at the Wilshire and Normandie Purple Line station, according to Good News Network, and uploaded it to Twitter where it quickly became a viral sensation.

"4 million people call LA home. 4 million stories. 4 million voices...sometimes you just have to stop and listen to one, to hear something beautiful," the LAPD wrote.

Zamourka's new-found popularity opened the door to her first on-stage singing debut after Los Angeles Councilmember Joe Buscaino invited her to perform at a celebration of Los Angeles' new Little Italy on Saturday, CNN reports.

"I didn't have much time to practice, so I'm just gonna sing the same song I sang on the subway...That ok with you?" Zamourka asked the audience.

She's also been offered a record deal by Grammy-nominated music producer Joel Diamond. "Emily's story is what dreams are made of," Diamond told CNN. "And I never turn my back on a dream."

"I don't even know what's happening," Zamourka told reporters after her debut performance. "It's so much, so fast."

Surprisingly, she's had no formal vocal training, but is a classically trained pianist and violinist, ABC 7 reports.

RELATED: A tragically beautiful video captures Parisians singing hymns as they watch Notre Dame burn

"You know why I do it in the subway is because it sounds so great," she said.

Zamourka used to play her violin around the city to make money until someone stole the $10,000 instrument three years ago. After a serious health challenge and the financial setback, she ended up on the street.

"That's when I became homeless when I could not actually pay any of my bills and could not pay any more of my rent." At the time, she told reporters she was sleeping on cardboard in a parking lot.

When she found out the subway video of her had become so popular, she said she just wanted to return to playing her music so she can get back on her feet.

"I will be so grateful to anyone who is trying to help me get off the streets and to have my own place and my instrument," Zamourka said.

Many locals commented on the video, sharing their own stories of interactions with Zamourka.

RELATED: When someone on the street asks you for money, what's your answer? This app can help.

"I've seen her for years on the Metro. I heard her once singing 'Ave Maria' and thought it was a radio at first. Everyone has a story...this woman does too. I don't know why she's been homeless all these years, but she's a human being...that's all that matters," one person wrote.

"She's from Glendale. She loves animals and sings Like a Bird. She is multi-talented and very friendly and kind. Her name is Emily," another person wrote.

Others, however, took the video as a chance to call out the homelessness crisis in Southern California.

Currently, there are more than 58,900 Angeleños experiencing homelessness, according to CNN. The situation is so bad, some officials are calling for it to be declared a state of emergency.

But with things looking up for Zamourka, hopefully there will soon be one less person having to live on the street.

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On July 27, a tweet about a homeless man looking for work went viral.

David Casarez, a web developer and Texas A&M graduate, was looking for work in the Bay Area, where he'd moved to achieve his dream of working in Silicon Valley. Eventually, Casarez had to move into his car because he couldn't afford housing — then it was repossessed. Now he sleeps on park benches.

He took to a crosswalk with a sign and hundreds of copies of his resume. Someone passing by took one and posted it to Twitter.

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