+
More

Why The Weather Channel is providing 9 hours of election counter-programming.

As your heartbeat ticks upward watching cable news, as you jolt awake at 2 a.m. from a Nov. 9 nightmare, and as you chew your fingernails to the bone watching volatile election forecasts every hour on the hour, please know: You're definitely not alone.

The Weather Channel is taking election anxiety seriously this year by doing something pretty cool on Nov. 8, 2016.

More than half of us — Democrats and Republicans alike — say that stress over the presidential election this year has been “very or somewhat significant," according to a study by the American Psychological Association. Experts in the mental health field have reported increases in election-related anxiety in their patients.  

“More than one client of mine has talked of physical nausea that they relate directly to current political happenings,” Melissa Lester Olson, a psychotherapist in Georgia, told Time, noting women have been particularly affected.


Starting at 3 p.m. Eastern time and lasting all the way to midnight, The Weather Channel will broadcast nothing but calming, tranquil scenery (with zero election interruptions) to "set your soul at ease."

Image via iStock.

So, after you cast your vote, you can sit back, relax, and tune in.

"This election year, American citizens have endured wall to wall breathless tension from our colleagues in the news media," TWC explained, "and our forecast calls for a 100% chance that will continue through election day."

Image via iStock.

"Wouldn't it be nice if we all had a place to escape?"

Image via iStock.

Absolutely, Weather Channel — absolutely.

According to TWC, viewers can expect to see scenes of "autumn splendor."

Yes, please.

Image via iStock.

Also, rainbows.

*sighs*

Image via iStock.

And big, puffy clouds in warm, colorful skies.

A good reminder that no matter what happens on Nov. 8, the world will go on. And we're all going to have to work together to be OK.

We're all going to be OK. (Right?)

Image via iStock.

TWC will also be playing smooth jazz for your listening pleasure.

Which, while it might not be your usual jam, after over a year of election coverage sounds nothing short of marvelous, right?

Image via iStock.

But if you're still reeling with anxiety on Tuesday — even with TWC playing softly in the background — don't fret.

There are other helpful ways you can manage your election stress.

Image via iStock.

You can, for instance, write down your election fears and address them, one by one. That may sound scary, but it will help.

Often when we work ourselves into a panic over who will win on Nov. 8, our minds spiral into a frenzy of "what-ifs" and worst-case scenarios.

It might sound silly, but one way to address this is to actually list out all of our fears.Why am I stressed about the prospects of a President [...]?

Then, think about each one.Is it truly possible that this fear could become a reality? If so, how can I make concrete plans to address this change in my own life?

As The Los Angeles Times reported, you may find that some of your worst fears are unfounded. Even if they are totally founded, thinking about how you can be proactive in addressing them can only help.

Image via iStock.

Elections can be brutal on our mental health. But the best way to not feel helpless is to do something about it and vote.

This election cycle hasn't been a normal one — particularly because many marginalized groups have been mocked, mistreated, and discussed like second-class citizens along the way. (It's no wonder why women, more than men, are viewing this election differently than past years.)

But the election is finally here, and you've made it. We've made it. All there is left to do now is make your voice heard at the ballot box.

Once you have, well, then there's The Weather Channel.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

Keep ReadingShow less
Democracy

The Onion filed a Supreme Court brief. It's both hilariously serious and seriously hilarious.

Who else could call the judiciary 'total Latin dorks' while making a legitimate point?

The Onion's Supreme Court brief uses parody to defend parody.

Political satire and parody have been around for at least 2,400 years, as ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes satirized the way Athenian leaders conducted the Peloponnesian War and parodied the dramatic styles of his contemporaries, Aeschylus and Euripides.

Satire and parody are used to poke fun and highlight issues, using mimicry and sarcasm to create comedic biting commentary. No modern outlet has been more prolific on this front than The Onion, and the popular satirical news site is defending parody as a vital free speech issue in a legal filing with the U.S. Supreme Court.

The filing is, as one might expect from The Onion, as brilliantly hilarious as it is serious, using the same satirical style it's defending in the crafting of the brief itself.

Keep ReadingShow less

She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

Keep ReadingShow less