Even for an industry built on drama, nobody saw that coming.

At the 89th Academy Awards, Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway made a mistake. It wasn't entirely their fault. But still — it was one helluva mistake.

Warren Beatty addresses the audience after a jaw-dropping mix-up announcing Best Picture. Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images.


They announced the Best Picture winner as "La La Land" — the heavy favorite to take Sunday's top prize. But due to a shocking mix-up, it was revealed that  "Moonlight" was the real winner.

“Moonlight” director Barry Jenkins, surrounded by his cast and crew, accepts the Oscar for Best Picture. Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images.

In a stunning, awkward, confusing and unprecedented 30 seconds of live television, the cast, crew, and creators of "La La Land" gracefully left the stage, and the team behind "Moonlight" — equally as confounded — rose to take it.

"This is not a joke, 'Moonlight' has won best picture," Jordan Horowitz, producer of "La La Land," said. "I'm going to be really proud to hand this to my friends from 'Moonlight.'"

As a stunned Barry Jenkins, the director of "Moonlight," took the stage, he said, "Even in my dreams, this could not be true. But to hell with dreams, I'm done with it because this is true."

Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling, stars of "La La Land," welcome Mahershala Ali, star of "Moonlight," to the stage. Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

The extraordinary reversal was doubly shocking because so many people expected "La La Land" to take Best Picture. The film, following the story of a struggling actress hellbent on reaching success, perfectly mirrors the film industry's self-obsession. Featuring a predominantly white cast, it also painfully embodies Hollywood's diversity problem.

So, when "La La Land" was first announced, many people hoping for another outcome felt their hearts sink. But in what felt like a last-minute, long-shot miracle, "Moonlight" — a movie that features a main character who is gay — was vindicated in a historic win for Best Picture.

"Moonlight" director Barry Jenkins (nearest) and screenwriter Tarell Alvin McCraney pose with their Oscars. Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images.

This surprise outcome was all the more extraordinary for the fact that "Moonlight" is precisely the type of film that usually gets snubbed at the Oscars.

The story explores poverty, race, drug addiction, and sexuality, and many critics have argued the film is as important as it is compelling. It's exceedingly rare when a Hollywood film gives a voice to the characters and storylines shown in "Moonlight."

"[The film's] inspiring to people — little black boys and brown girls and other folks watching at home who feel marginalized," co-executive producer Adele Romanski said on stage.

In continuing the acceptance speech, Jenkins added, "There was a time when I thought this movie was impossible, because ... I couldn't bring it to fruition. I couldn't bring myself to tell another story. Everybody behind me on this stage said, no, that is not acceptable."

Sunday night, the world watched the kind of powerful, validating, surprising underdog victory that we only find believable in the movies — giving all of us hope that stories about empathy can triumph over escapism and that stories that give voice to diverse experiences can be recognized at the highest levels of our culture.

Watch "Moonlight" win Best Picture below:

True

It takes a special type of person to become a nurse. The job requires a combination of energy, empathy, clear mind, oftentimes a strong stomach, and a cheerful attitude. And while people typically think of nursing in a clinical setting, some nurses are driven to work with the people that feel forgotten by society.

Keep Reading Show less

Emily Calandrelli was stopped by TSA agents when she tried to bring her ice packs for pumped milk through airport security.

Traveling without your baby for the first time can be tough. And if you're breastfeeding, it can be even tougher, as you have to pump milk every few hours to keep your body producing enough, to avoid an enormous amount of discomfort and to prevent risk of infection.

But for Emily Calandrelli, taking a recent work trip away from her 10-week-old son was far more challenging than it needed to be.

Calandrelli is a mom of two, an aerospace engineer and the host of the Netflix kids' science show "Emily's Wonder Lab." She was recently taking her first work trip since welcoming her second child, which included a five-hour flight from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C. Calandrelli is breastfeeding her son and had planned to pump just before boarding the plane. She brought ice packs to keep the milk from spoiling during the flight, but when she tried to go through airport security, the TSA agents refused to let her take some of her supplies.

Keep Reading Show less

Courtesy of Elaine Ahn

True

The energy in a hospital can sometimes feel overwhelming, whether you’re experiencing it as a patient, visitor or employee. However, there are a few one-of-a-kind individuals like Elaine Ahn, an operating room registered nurse in Diamond Bar, California, who thrive under this type of constant pressure.

Keep Reading Show less

Prior to baby formula, breastfeeding was the norm, but that doesn't mean it always worked.

As if the past handful of years weren't challenging enough, the U.S. is currently dealing with a baby formula crisis.

Due to a perfect storm of supply chain issues, product recalls, labor shortages and inflation, manufacturers are struggling to keep up with formula demand and retailers are rationing supplies. As a result, families that rely on formula are scrambling to ensure that their babies get the food they need.

Naturally, people are weighing in on the crisis, with some throwing out simplistic advice like, "Why don't you just do what people did before baby formula was invented and just breastfeed?"

That might seem logical, unless you understand how breastfeeding works and know a bit about infant mortality throughout human history.

Keep Reading Show less

Yuri has a very important message for his co-workers.

While every person with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is different, there are some common communication traits that everyone should understand. Many with ASD process language literally and have a hard time understanding body language, social cues, exaggeration and cultural cues.

This can lead to misunderstandings that result in people with ASD appearing to be rude when it wasn't their intent. If more neurotypical people (those without ASD) better understood these communication differences, it’d be much easier for everyone to get along.

A perfect example of this problem and how to fix it was shared by Yuri, a transmasc person who goes by he/they, who posts on TikTok about having ADHD and ASD. In a post that has more than 2.3 million views, Yuri claims he was “booked for a disciplinary meeting for being a bad communicator.”

Keep Reading Show less