This White House email shows a glaring commonality in who has Kavanaugh's back.

On July 9, President Donald Trump nominated Judge Brett Kavanaugh to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court. Shortly after, the White House rounded up a list of quotes from senators and representatives enthusiastically endorsing the decision and packaged them up nicely in a public statement to the media.

"This is an excellent choice," House Speaker Paul Ryan chimed in. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell celebrated Kavanaugh as an "impressive nominee." Louisiana's Bill Cassidy called him a "solid pick."


There was one glaring similarity between every person quoted in the White House's statement, though.

As noted by Planned Parenthood's Greg Greene, all 34 of them were men.

And none, by the way, were people of color.

Should anyone be surprised?

On the campaign trail, Trump promised to select staunchly conservative, pro-life judges. With the addition of Neil Gorsuch and Kavanaugh (should his nomination be confirmed by Congress), the Supreme Court's ideological make-up will have already taken a decidedly sharp right under the 45th president.  

And Trump isn't even halfway through his first term in office.

Kavanaugh speaks at a White House press conference. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty.

Kavanaugh's track record suggests he may be a deciding vote to gut or end Roe v. Wade — the landmark 1973 ruling giving a constitutional right to those seeking abortion.

In 2006, Kavanaugh told Sen. Chuck Schumer he "would follow Roe v. Wade faithfully and fully," while getting confirmed to the D.C. Circuit Court but stubbornly refused to answer how he personally viewed the decision.

Last October, however, Kavanaugh sided with the Trump administration in Garza v. Hargana, blocking an imprisoned 17-year-old immigrant from terminating her pregnancy. Kavanaugh's opinion on the matter reflects how his presence on the Supreme Court could spell disaster for women's rights in the decades to come, advocates warn.

After all, ending legal abortion won't stop abortions from happening — they'll increase the number of unsafe abortions happening.

No wonder all 34 of those Kavanaugh cheerleaders were white men.

If Kavanaugh's nomination concerns you, reach out to your senator and tell them why — especially if you live in a state with a senator who could make the deciding vote.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Ready for the weekend? Of course, you are. Here's our weekly dose of good vibes to help you shed the stresses of the workweek and put yourself in a great frame of mind.

These 10 stories made us happy this week because they feature amazing creativity, generosity, and one super-cute fish.

1. Diver befriends a fish with the cutest smile

Hawaiian underwater photographer Yuki Nakano befriended a friendly porcupine fish and now they hang out regularly.

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