This White House email shows a glaring commonality in who has Kavanaugh's back.

On July 9, President Donald Trump nominated Judge Brett Kavanaugh to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court. Shortly after, the White House rounded up a list of quotes from senators and representatives enthusiastically endorsing the decision and packaged them up nicely in a public statement to the media.

"This is an excellent choice," House Speaker Paul Ryan chimed in. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell celebrated Kavanaugh as an "impressive nominee." Louisiana's Bill Cassidy called him a "solid pick."


There was one glaring similarity between every person quoted in the White House's statement, though.

As noted by Planned Parenthood's Greg Greene, all 34 of them were men.

And none, by the way, were people of color.

Should anyone be surprised?

On the campaign trail, Trump promised to select staunchly conservative, pro-life judges. With the addition of Neil Gorsuch and Kavanaugh (should his nomination be confirmed by Congress), the Supreme Court's ideological make-up will have already taken a decidedly sharp right under the 45th president.  

And Trump isn't even halfway through his first term in office.

Kavanaugh speaks at a White House press conference. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty.

Kavanaugh's track record suggests he may be a deciding vote to gut or end Roe v. Wade — the landmark 1973 ruling giving a constitutional right to those seeking abortion.

In 2006, Kavanaugh told Sen. Chuck Schumer he "would follow Roe v. Wade faithfully and fully," while getting confirmed to the D.C. Circuit Court but stubbornly refused to answer how he personally viewed the decision.

Last October, however, Kavanaugh sided with the Trump administration in Garza v. Hargana, blocking an imprisoned 17-year-old immigrant from terminating her pregnancy. Kavanaugh's opinion on the matter reflects how his presence on the Supreme Court could spell disaster for women's rights in the decades to come, advocates warn.

After all, ending legal abortion won't stop abortions from happening — they'll increase the number of unsafe abortions happening.

No wonder all 34 of those Kavanaugh cheerleaders were white men.

If Kavanaugh's nomination concerns you, reach out to your senator and tell them why — especially if you live in a state with a senator who could make the deciding vote.

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Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

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In the hours before he was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States, then-President-elect Biden was sent a letter signed by 17 freshmen GOP members of the House of Representatives.

In sharp contrast to the 121 Republican House members who voted against the certification of Biden's electoral votes—a constitutional procedure merely check-marking the state certifications that had already taken place—this letter expresses a desire to "rise above the partisan fray" and work together with Biden as he takes over the presidency.

The letter reads:

Dear President-elect Biden,

Congratulations on the beginning of your administration and presidency. As members of this freshman class, we trust that the next four years will present your administration and the 117thCongress with numerous challenges and successes, and we are hopeful that – despite our ideological differences – we may work together on behalf of the American people we are each so fortunate to serve.

After two impeachments, lengthy inter-branch investigations, and, most recently, the horrific attack on our nation's capital, it is clear that the partisan divide between Democrats and Republicans does not serve a single American.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.