This White House email shows a glaring commonality in who has Kavanaugh's back.

On July 9, President Donald Trump nominated Judge Brett Kavanaugh to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court. Shortly after, the White House rounded up a list of quotes from senators and representatives enthusiastically endorsing the decision and packaged them up nicely in a public statement to the media.

"This is an excellent choice," House Speaker Paul Ryan chimed in. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell celebrated Kavanaugh as an "impressive nominee." Louisiana's Bill Cassidy called him a "solid pick."


There was one glaring similarity between every person quoted in the White House's statement, though.

As noted by Planned Parenthood's Greg Greene, all 34 of them were men.

And none, by the way, were people of color.

Should anyone be surprised?

On the campaign trail, Trump promised to select staunchly conservative, pro-life judges. With the addition of Neil Gorsuch and Kavanaugh (should his nomination be confirmed by Congress), the Supreme Court's ideological make-up will have already taken a decidedly sharp right under the 45th president.  

And Trump isn't even halfway through his first term in office.

Kavanaugh speaks at a White House press conference. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty.

Kavanaugh's track record suggests he may be a deciding vote to gut or end Roe v. Wade — the landmark 1973 ruling giving a constitutional right to those seeking abortion.

In 2006, Kavanaugh told Sen. Chuck Schumer he "would follow Roe v. Wade faithfully and fully," while getting confirmed to the D.C. Circuit Court but stubbornly refused to answer how he personally viewed the decision.

Last October, however, Kavanaugh sided with the Trump administration in Garza v. Hargana, blocking an imprisoned 17-year-old immigrant from terminating her pregnancy. Kavanaugh's opinion on the matter reflects how his presence on the Supreme Court could spell disaster for women's rights in the decades to come, advocates warn.

After all, ending legal abortion won't stop abortions from happening — they'll increase the number of unsafe abortions happening.

No wonder all 34 of those Kavanaugh cheerleaders were white men.

If Kavanaugh's nomination concerns you, reach out to your senator and tell them why — especially if you live in a state with a senator who could make the deciding vote.

More
Youtube

Flowers are a great way to express your feelings for someone. Red roses say, "I love you," but a whole garden of pink flowers screams it. One husband took the romantic gesture of getting your wife flowers to the next level.

Mr. and Mrs. Kuroki got married in 1956, and Mrs. Kuroki joined her husband on his dairy farm in Shintomi, Japan, The Telegraph reports. The couple lived a full life and had two kids. After 30 years of marriage, the couple planned on retiring and traveling around Japan, but those plans were soon dashed.

When she was 52, Mrs. Kuroki lost her vision due to complications from diabetes. Her blindness hit her hard, and she began staying inside all day. Mr. Kuroki knew his wife was depressed and wanted to do something to cheer her up.

Mr. Kuroki noticed some people stopping to admire his small garden of pink shibazakura flowers (also known as moss phlox) and got an idea. He couldn't take his wife to see the world, so he had to make the world come to his wife.

Keep Reading Show less
Family

Men are sharing examples of how they step up and step in when they see problematic behaviors in their peers, and people are here for it.

Twitter user "feminist next door" posed an inquiry to her followers, asking "good guys" to share times they saw misogyny or predatory behavior and did something about it. "What did you say," she asked. "What are your suggestions for the other other men in this situation?" She added a perfectly fitting hashtag: #NotCoolMan.

Not only did the good guys show up for the thread, but their stories show how men can interrupt situations when they see women being mistreated and help put a stop to it.

Keep Reading Show less
lop
Culture

Whenever someone's words or behavior are called out as racist, a few predictable responses always follow. One is to see the word "racist" as a vicious personal attack. Two is to vehemently deny that whatever was said or done was racist. And three is to pull out the dictionary definition of racism to prove that the words or behavior weren't racist.

Honestly, as soon as someone refers to the dictionary when discussing racism, it's clear that person has never delved deeply into trying to understand racism. It's a big old red flag, every time.

I'm not an expert on race relations, but I've spent many years learning from people who are. And I've learned that the reality of racism is nuanced and complex, and resorting to a short dictionary definition completely ignores that fact. The dictionary can't include all of the ways racism manifests in individuals and society, and the limitations of dictionary definitions make it a poor tool for discussing the topic.

Since "racism" is such a loaded term for many people, let's look at such limitations through a different complex word. Let's take "anxiety." According to Merriam-Webster, "anxiety" is defined as "apprehensive uneasiness or nervousness, usually over an impending or anticipated ill."

Keep Reading Show less
Democracy
Photo by Hunters Race on Unsplash

If you're a woman and you want to be a CEO, you should probably think about changing your name to "Jeffrey" or "Michael." Or possibly even "Michael Jeffreys" or "Jeffrey Michaels."

According to Fortune, last year, more men named Jeffrey and Michael became CEOs of America's top companies than women. A whopping total of one woman became a CEO, while two men named Jeffrey took the title, and two men named Michael moved into the C-suite as well.

The "New CEO Report" for 2018, which looks at new CEOS for the 250 largest S&P 500 companies, found that 23 people were appointed to the position of CEO. Only one of those 23 people was a woman. Michelle Gass, the new CEO of Kohl's, was the lone female on the list.

Keep Reading Show less
popular