The delicious tale of Popeye, a famous rescue pup now living in food paradise.

Popeye the pup is a furry 4-year-old living it up in Southern California.

All photos courtesy of ​Popeye the Foodie Dog/Instagram.

But things weren't always so bright and sunny for the little guy.


About three years ago, his human, Ivy Diep, spotted him wandering the streets alone — dirty, heavily matted, and skinny.

"He had just crossed a major street and I thought, 'Oh, I hope that pup's going to be okay,'" Diep wrote in an email. "I had returned home that day and was about to head out again when I saw him again across the street from my house."

This is what Popeye looked like when Diep first found him on the street.

Concerned for his safety, Diep called out to him.

"He actually came to me!" she said. "Some dogs would bolt, but he didn't."

Diep loved Popeye but was hesitant to welcome him to the family at first. After all, she already had a house full of pets; she wasn't looking for any more canine additions. But no one else would take him.

She decided it must be meant to be. And boy, was it a great decision.

Although Popeye can sometimes be "a loud barky monster to new people and dogs," Diep said, now he fits right in.

"It wasn't long before he made himself at home at my place with my other dogs," Diep told Bored Panda. "And of course, my husband and I fell in love [with him, too]."

Popeye, like many dogs, loved being out and about. So Diep began bringing him on lunch dates and documenting the fun.

Their foodie adventures are as adorable as they are delicious.

So adorable, in fact, that a friend of Diep's recommended she start Popeye's own Instagram account to share their lunch dates with the world.

Today, Popeye the Foodie Dog has over 131,000 followers on Instagram.

It's difficult to know what fans enjoy most — the mouth-watering food they get to scroll through, or Popeye's delightful little expressions.

"He has a lot of personality in his face," Diep said. "It's adorable to capture."

Don't worry, though — Popeye doesn't eat any of the human food that could harm him. The photos are mostly just for show.

"He'll get nibbles of anything that's safe," Diep explained. "I also carry a bag of treats for him, in case there's nothing he can have."

Mostly, though, Popeye just loves getting out there and seeing the world.

Sometimes he'll dress for the occasion, too. Like on St. Patrick's Day.

"Where's the green beer?" reads the caption on Popeye's Instagram. "Giant prawns with garlic butter sauce over rice for our St. Patrick's Day lunch."

When Popeye's itching to get a taste of some French crepes, he's got to look the part.

And when he's enjoying a plate of BBQ? Cowboy hats are mandatory.

Diep is so glad she saved Popeye from the streets that day three years ago. Who knows what would have happened to him otherwise?

Many dogs aren't so lucky. It's difficult to tally the exact numbers, but the ASPCA estimates roughly 7.6 million cats and dogs stay in shelters across the U.S. each year. That figure, of course, doesn't include the millions more that are living on the street, like Popeye had been.

Tragically, when they're not adopted or returned to their humans, many of these animals are euthanized. That's why helping rescue dogs (and cats) find forever homes is so crucial.

Diep certainly recommends welcoming a rescue if it's right for you and your family, but with one big disclaimer: You must practice patience.

"Although Popeye was pretty easy as he's a really mellow, chill dog," she noted. "He was not house-trained and had a lot of fears — loud noise or a stick of any kind."

"He used to bolt anytime he saw us lift a broom or duster, even chopsticks.  It made me wonder if he was possibly traumatized in his past," she said.  

"I don't know what he went through before us, but I'm just glad that he's learned to love and trust that we won't hurt him."  

As is the case with welcoming any new dog to the home, there have been a few bumps in the road. But the pros of accepting Popeye far outweigh the cons.

"All the work in house-training him and the property damage he caused was all worth it," Diep said.  

There are probably plenty of cats and dogs in your own area that could use a warm bed and four walls to call home.

Help dogs like Popeye find forever homes in your own community today.

Photo courtesy of Yoplait
True

When Benny Mendez asked his middle school P.E. students why they wanted to participate in STOKED—his new after school program where kids can learn to skateboard, snowboard, and surf—their answers surprised him.

I want to be able to finally see the beach, students wrote. I want to finally be able to see the snow.

Never having seen snow is understandable for Mendez's students, most who live in Inglewood, CA, just outside of Los Angeles. But never having been to the beach is surprising, since most of them only live 15-20 minutes from the ocean. Mendez discovered many of them don't even know how to swim.

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Photo courtesy of Yoplait

What Mendez can control is what he gives his students when they're in his care, which is understanding, some structure, and the chance to try new things. Mendez wakes up at 4:00 a.m. most days and often doesn't get home until 9:00 p.m. as he works tirelessly to help kids thrive. Not only does he run after school programs, but he coaches youth soccer on the weekends as well. He also works closely with other teachers and guidance counselors at the school to build strong relationships with students, and even serves as a mentor to his former students who are now in high school.

Now Mendez is earning accolades far and wide for his efforts both in and out of the classroom, including a surprise award from Yoplait and Box Tops for Education.

Yoplait and Box Tops are partnering this school year to help students reach their fullest potential, which includes celebrating teachers and programs that support that mission. Yoplait is committed to providing experiences for kids and families to connect through play, so teaming up with Box Tops provided an opportunity to support programs like STOKED.

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This article originally appeared on 5.7.15



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Photo courtesy of Macy's
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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

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Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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