The clever name Ellen and Portia gave their new 'Kid' to stop the paparazzi's questions.

Ellen DeGeneres has announced that she and her wife, Portia de Rossi made the happy decision to bring a kid into their family. 

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for The People's Choice Awards.

But, there's a clever twist — they aren't welcoming a kid of the crawling, crying, human, bottle-fed variety. 


They're welcoming an adorable 9-week-old puppy, and they've named him "Kid."

World, meet Portia's and my new puppy, Kid.

A photo posted by Ellen (@theellenshow) on

How did the puppy earn his unique name? Thank nosy reporters.

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for The People's Choice Awards.

"There have been rumors forever, 'When are you and Portia gonna have a kid?'" DeGeneres said with a laugh. "So, now I can say we have a Kid. So it can just stop."

While Ellen can joke about their decision on her show, for many women, the frequent pressure to start a family is no laughing matter.

While most women aren't plagued with paparazzi asking about their baby-making plans, the message from the media (not to mention family and friends) remains loud and clear: If you're a woman of certain age, you should probably go ahead and raise a family.

But, data shows that more and more women are choosing to be child-free. In fact 47.6% of women ages 15 to 44 do not have kids, the highest percentage of that figure since the Census Bureau started tracking it in 1976. And while some of those women may eventually elect to have kids, the increase in this figure is worth noting.

Photo by Roberto Faccenda/Flickr.

Even though child-free women are growing in number, women who choose to be child-free are still met with judgment, criticism, and sympathy. As Upworthy's own Doyin Richards wrote in a recent piece, a woman choosing to be child-free doesn't mean she's selfish or that she dislikes kids or that she wants or needs your pity. 

These women are just making the best choice for their situation and for their lives. Imagine that! 

Of course, in some cases, it's not that women without children don't want children. They might be experiencing fertility issues or facing other extenuating circumstances, which can make incessant questions and pressure to have children all the more painful. 

Though Ellen and Portia aren't raising children of their own, adding Kid to the mix gave them a new appreciation for moms everywhere.

And while raising a puppy isn't akin to raising an infant, it's not a walk in the park either. (Unless you're being dragged through the park by a very happy, fuzzy animal.) Because like his namesake, Kid is keeping his moms up at night. 

“He’s nine weeks old and cute as can be, but I’ll tell you what’s not cute is to wake up at 11, and 1, and 3, and 5," the host said on her show. “I’m trying to hold a puppy while I’m trying to make coffee. And I can’t do anything. He doesn’t let me do anything.”

Puppyhood is rough, Ellen. Good thing they're so freaking cute. 

Image via TheEllenShow/YouTube.

Watch Ellen's sweet announcement from Thursday's show.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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We know that mammals feed their young with milk from their own bodies, and we know that whales are mammals. But the logistics of how some whales make breastfeeding happen has been a bit of a mystery for scientists. Such has been the case with sperm whales.

Sperm whales are uniquely shaped, with humongous, block-shaped heads that house the largest brains in the animal world. Like other cetaceans, sperm whale babies rely on their mother's milk for sustenance in their first year or two. And also like other cetaceans, a sperm whale mama's nipple is inverted—it doesn't stick out from her body like many mammals, but rather is hidden inside a mammary slit.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less