+

politics

Pop Culture

Thousands of people are sharing the celebrity they want to be president. Here are the top 15.

"It's 2024, and the U.S. has elected a random celebrity as president, who do you want it to be?"

Keanu Reeves, Dolly Parton and Morgan Freeman.

Throughout the years there have been some notable celebrities who have changed careers to become politicians. The most notable is Ronald Reagan, who went from a ‘50s B-list actor to governor of California (1967 to 1975) and then President of the United States (1981 to 1989).

There was also Donald Trump who went from the host of “Celebrity Apprentice” to becoming a one-term president (2017 to 2021) and action star Arnold Schwarzenegger who served as Governor of California from (2003 to 2011).

Former actor and “Saturday Night Live” writer Al Franken was a Senator in Minnesota from 2009 to 2018 until he stepped down amidst allegations of misconduct.

Keep Reading Show less
Democracy

Last year, this Fox News host explained why Trump shouldn't be allowed to run again

Juan Williams says there's a strong legal case to block Trump from ever becoming president again.

via jlhervàs / Flickr

This article originally appeared on 08.17.21


If Donald Trump decides to run for president in 2024, there's a good chance that he'll win the Republican nomination. A recent survey from the John Bolton Super PAC found that 46% of likely general election voters would back Trump being the party's nominee.

Florida governor Ron DeSantis came in a distant second with 13% support.

Keep Reading Show less
Pop Culture

'A Run for More' shows us what it's like to be a transgender candidate in Texas politics

It's a story of hope, self and fighting for your seat at the table.

Frankie Gonzales-Wolfe is the subject of the documentary, "A Run for More."

When we think about elections, so many of us focus on presidential elections and forget about congressional, statewide or even smaller, local elections. The documentary film, “A Run for More,” focuses on Frankie Gonzales-Wolfe as she runs for one of those local positions—city council member in San Antonio, Texas. Focusing on Gonzales-Wolfe as the first openly transgender woman to run for such office, the film shows how the campaign gave Gonzales-Wolfe a deeper sense of self. I was lucky enough to chat with her and the film’s director, Ray Whitehouse, about their friendship, the campaign, making the film and Frankie’s future political plans.

Keep Reading Show less

CNN host Anderson Cooper and Tucker Carlson of Fox News.

The prevailing logic in today’s political world is that polarization is worsening because people live in media echo chambers where they are only exposed to outlets that mirror their views.

People who live in echo chambers come to distrust any opinions that exist outside of their bubbles and when they're not exposed to any conflicting information. This creates a scenario where the person becomes increasingly entrenched in their worldview.

One would assume that after a person becomes fully entrenched in an echo chamber they have little chance of changing their views. However, a new working paper by researchers at Stanford and Yale universities has found that when people are removed from their bubbles there’s a chance they’ll change their minds.

David Broockman of Stanford and Joshua Kalla of Yale conducted a study where they paid regular Fox News viewers $15 an hour to watch CNN for around seven hours a week for a month. The researchers then surveyed them about their political beliefs and knowledge of current events.

Keep Reading Show less