Patagonia has taken "family-friendly workplace" to a whole new level, and people are noticing.

The outdoor clothing and gear company has made a name for itself by putting its money where its mouth is. From creating backpacks out of 100% recycled materials to donating their $10 million tax cut to fight climate change to refusing to sell to clients who harm the environment, Patagonia leads by example.

That dedication to principle is clear in its policies for parents who work for them, as evidenced by a viral post from Holly Morisette, a recruiter at Patagonia.

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A breastfeeding mom was kicked out of a Texas pool because some people can't handle babies eating.

The solution to the issue of breastfeeding in public is incredibly simple. It's called "Move Your Eyeballs."

A Texas mom was kicked out of a public pool because apparently some people don't know what to do when a baby eats near them.

Misty Daugereaux was enjoying a day at Nessler Family Aquatic Center in Texas City, Texas with her nephew and two sons when she fed her 10-month-old.

She didn't rip off her top and start giving a lifeguard a lap dance. She didn't walk up to people's lounge chairs and shove her breasts into their faces. She didn't shout, "Hey everyone, come over here and watch my peep show!" She simply breastfed her baby.

Apparently, some folks at the pool took issue with Daugereaux feeding her baby near them, however. A lifeguard approached her and told her she needed to cover up. She said she didn't actually need to, and that she had a right to feed her baby there. Then the pool manager got involved. Then the police were called.

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If you don’t believe the hospital experience for new mothers has changed that much in the last few decades, read through the mind-blowing instructions one institution issued every one of their postpartum patients.

“My mom was going through her things and we saw this, it's rules in regards to just having a baby,” Micala Gabrielle Henson wrote alongside the document which she posted on Facebook. The letter had been issued to her grandmother the day her mother was born.

“INSTRUCTION FOR MOTHERS,” the slightly yellowed document issued by Cabarrus Memorial Hospital in Concord, North Carolina reads.

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In a move that baffled much of the world, the U.S. tried to shut down a global resolution to encourage breastfeeding.

For decades, research has tended to show that human breast milk — when it's possible to use it — is the safest, healthiest food for babies around the world. A 2016 series in the British medical journal The Lancet — the most in-depth analysis of the health impact of breastfeeding to date — concluded that more than 800,000 babies and 20,000 mothers' lives could be saved each year with universal breastfeeding, at a cost savings of $300 billion.

A mother in the Central African Republic breastfeeds her child while they wait to see the doctor in a clinic with no running water. Photo via Florent Vergnes/Getty Images.

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