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People are loving this hilarious viral post about a dad bottle-feeding his baby in public.

Despite being the primary method of feeding babies for-literally-ever, breastfeeding in public is still a hot topic of debate.

As someone who's written about parenting for more than a decade, I can attest that few topics prompt a greater outpouring of opinion than breastfeeding in public. The first blog post I ever had go viral was a response to breastfeeding in public criticisms. My most-shared article for Upworthy was about public breastfeeding finally being legally protected in all 50 states. And this video I made for a commenter on that post who said she didn't want to see women breastfeeding in public has been shared thousands of times across various platforms:

Never feel uncomfortable watching a woman breastfeed again!

A commenter expressed her frustration at having to watch women breastfeed in public. Luckily, we have a built-in ability that makes it so that we never EVER have to be subjected to such things.


Posted by Annie Reneau, Writer on Friday, August 24, 2018

People feel very strongly about babies being breastfed in public and they aren't afraid to say so. Perhaps that's why this dad's Facebook post about bottle feeding his baby in public has so resonated with people that it's been shared 25,000+ times.

The story this dad tells about being harassed for his "exposed biceps" is hilariously familiar to breastfeeders.

Blogger Simon Harris shared a photo of him feeding his baby a bottle on his "Man Behaving Dadly" Facebook page with an accompanying description of what happened when he dared to do it in public.

I’m absolutely furious! James wanted his bottle today while we were in a coffee shop, and as soon as I started feeding...

Posted by Man Behaving Dadly on Friday, March 22, 2019

I’m absolutely furious!,” Harris wrote. “James wanted his bottle today while we were in a coffee shop, and as soon as I started feeding him a lady came over and told me that my exposed biceps were putting her off her food and that I should put a sweatshirt on.

*Snort*Okay, we can see where this is going, right?

Because I was holding the bottle at a certain angle apparently it was making my right bicep look too pumped and she said she would complain to the manager. It’s not my fault - when you are bottle feeding your arms get engorged because of all the lifting and holding, as well as the scooping and sterilising.

I told her to leave me alone as I was just providing nourishment for my baby. However, just a few minutes after that, another lady came over, winked at me and told me that she ‘wanted a go’ as well before walking back to her husband who told me not to pay any attention to her as she always makes harmless comments like this and nobody complained in the old days.

Before I knew what was going on, a manager came over and asked if I would like to give him the rest of his bottle in the little room where they keep the dishwasher supplies as it would be ‘more comfortable’ for me. How the hell would squatting on a crate of Finish tablets be ‘more comfortable?’”

Yep. The alleged disgust, the inappropriate comments, and the invitation to feed the baby in an uncomfortable place—it’s all par for the course for parents who breastfeed.

What's funny about Harris's post is that it's so recognizable and predictable. Cue the “Taking a crap is natural, but we don’t do that in public!” commenters, the “Breasts are sex organs!” folks, and the “What about the children?!” pearl-clutchers who love comparing the feeding of babies with having sex or defecating in public. It happens every time this subject comes up.

I've spent many hours explaining to people why those responses are basically bunk. For those who feel tempted to make those kind of arguments, please watch this brief video before you start typing:

Breastfeeding in Public vs. Peeing and Pooping in Public

New video! BREASTFEEDING IN PUBLIC VS. PEEING AND POOPING IN PUBLICI can't even count how many comments I've seen making this comparison. Here's why it's bunk.

Posted by Annie Reneau, Writer on Sunday, September 2, 2018

For those who say it's just so easy to find someplace private to feed a baby, consider which is easier: For mom with a hungry baby to gather up all of her stuff, including perhaps her other small children whom she may have with her, to go find a place that every human in the vicinity considers a discreet enough place for her to breastfeed? Or for a person who doesn't want to see a baby breastfeeding to simply move their eyeballs half an inch in their sockets so they don't have to watch?

Harris concluded his post: "Anyway I bet 97% of you won’t share this, mainly because it’s a load of bollocks and people are only monumental arseholes about boobs for some reason."

Seriously.

Harris's satire is on point, but the satirical comments on the post further drive it home.

If you've ever read an online debate about breastfeeding in public, you'll recognize the hilarity in these comments on Harris's post:

"Well why didn't you just feed him before you went out because thats how it works right?" wrote one woman. "I think you just did it to show off your guns and seek attention. Your biceps should be for your wife's eyes only. Have some respect for yourself!"

"How would I explain this to my children for goodness sakes?" wrote another commenter. "They’ve never even seen their father's biceps, well only in rare instances while he’s doing manly yard work outside in the heat (although he still is quite discreet). I think it should be MY choice if I should be forced to explain to my children what biceps were made by God to do. Shame on you. This is why you should cover up that arm and that baby. Think of everyone else."

Oh, man. This is all too familiar. As is this:

"Why did you have to put this on Facebook? You're just begging for attention? Back in my day people bottle fed their babies discretely. I'm sick of it being pushed in my face."

And this: "Feeding the baby is perfectly natural but so is pooping and you don’t see people doing that in public do you 😠 why don’t you have some self respect and cover up with a towel people shouldn’t have to be exposed to your biceps when they are TrYiNg tO EaT."

Bottom line: Babies gotta eat. And whether they're being fed from a breast or a bottle, you don't have to watch. Our eyeballs move for a reason. It really is as simple as that.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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You could say Marine biologist, divemaster and National Geographic Explorer Dr. Erika Woolsey is a bit of a coral reef whisperer, one who brings her passion for ocean science to folks on dry land in a fresh, innovative and fun new way using virtual reality.

Images courtesy of Meta’s Community Voices film series

Her non-profit, The Hydrous, combines science, design, and technology to provide one-of-a-kind experiential education about marine life. In 2018, Hydrous produced “Immerse 360”, a virtual underwater journey through the coral reefs of Palau, with Dr. Woolsey as a guide.

Viewers got to swim with sharks, manta rays and sea turtles while exploring gorgeous aquatic landscapes and learning about the crucial role our oceans play—all from 360° and 3D footage captured by VRTUL 2 underwater storytelling VR cameras.


Hydrous then expanded on the idea to develop two more exciting augmented adventures using Meta Quest 2 technology: “Expedition Palau,” a live event where audiences can share a “synchronized immersive reality experience”, which includes live narration from Woolsey, and “Explore,” a “CGI experience” to enjoy the magic of the ocean at home.


www.youtube.com

“I’ve been extremely fortunate to explore and study coral reefs around the world,” Woolsey said, sharing that it was “heartbreaking” to see these important habitats decay so rapidly while the latest scientific reports did not clearly lead to widespread compassionate action.

“How do we care about something we never see or experience?” she reflected. As she discovered, virtual reality would be a powerful solution for eliciting empathy. “VR has the ability to generate presence and agency and make you feel like you’re there. It's that emotional connection that can bridge scientific discovery and public understanding”

The combination of virtual reality and the ocean’s natural breathtaking beauty is, as Woolsey puts it, a “match made in heaven” for getting people more engaged in ocean education. “When you’re floating you can look up and down and all around you…seeing a school of fish surrounding you and reefs in these cathedral-like structures. Rather than watching a video of a scientist, you get to become the scientist.”

Hydrous also has special kits to provide middle school students hands-on learning about ocean life. In addition to a journal, activity cards and a smartphone VR viewer, each kit includes lifelike 3D printed model pieces of a coral reef so that middle school students can try building their own.

These reef models even turn white when temperatures rise inside the aquarium, which mimics the real “bleaching” that corals endure when they die due to higher than normal ocean temperatures. Students really do become scientists as they figure out how to bring color back to their reef.

While it’s true that the health of our oceans affects us all, the growing threats our oceans face—pollution, overfishing, climate change—don’t always affect us on an empathetic level. Through the use of technology, Woolsey has created an innovative way to connect hearts and minds to one of the Earth’s most important resources, which can inspire real and lasting change.

“We can’t bring everybody to the ocean, but we’re finding scalable ways to bring the ocean to everyone.”

To learn more about Hydrous, click here.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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