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boy gives grandpa baseball, heartwarming video instagram, viral instagram

All the emotional bases are covered.

People are absolutely loving Felix and his grandpa Bruce Carrier. A clip showing Felix gifting his home run baseball to his beloved gramps is already sweet enough, but it’s the loving words that really have folks tearing up.

The heartwarming video, posted to Instagram by Felix’s mom, Melissa Carrier-Damon, shows the young boy step up to his grandpa, all while smiling from ear to ear.

"So you know I got two home runs right?" Felix says to Carrier, before adding in that he also got a grand slam during the game.

He continues: "I signed the ball for you and it says 'Papa I love you'."

“Why did you do that?” Carrier asks, his voice instantly full of emotion.

Without missing a beat, the doting grandson replies, “because you taught me everything about baseball."


“Oh honey bunny,” Carrier cries as they share a hug.

It’s such a simple moment, but it really contained so much feel-good fuzzies that it quickly went viral, getting nearly 500,000 views.

Several commented on how touching it was.

“I'm crying! such a special bond they have, I love how Grandpa calls him honey, so sweet,” wrote one person.

Another gushed, “this is all heart ❤️ ❤️ thank you for sharing this beautiful moment.”

It also inspired some grandparent appreciation.

“Goodness this is the sweetest video! Grandparents are so damn precious!” exclaimed one person.

Another shared, “that made me miss my grandfather.”

In an interview with TODAY, Carrier-Damon shared that the baseball gift had been entirely Felix’s idea. Since Felix began playing at the age of 4, Carrier (a former college baseball coach) had been a constant support to Felix—one who played catch with him, took him to batting practice and never missed one of his games.

“[He’s] just a really big part of the family,” Carrier-Damon told TODAY.

Carrier confessed with USA Today that he still gets “teary-eyed’ revisiting the video. “I'm so proud he let me be part of that day."

You’re not alone, Carrier. As far as wholesome, happy tear-inducing family videos go, that one is a bona fide home run.

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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


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