Amandla Stenberg, star of "The Hunger Games" and "Everything, Everything," first came out as bisexual in 2016.

During her takeover of Teen Vogue's Snapchat channel, the star spoke about why it's important to be open about her sexuality and the pain that comes from remaining quiet.

"We cannot be suppressed," she said. "We are meant to express our joy and our love and our tears and be big and bold and definitely not easy to swallow. Here I am being myself and it's definitely hard and vulnerable, and it's definitely a process, but I'm learning and I'm growing."

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William isn't allowed to tell his LGBTQ students he's on their side, so he has to do it in code. When he overhears them chatting with friends, he strains to absorb the language they use with one another and repeat it one-on-one. In counseling sessions, he refers to the significant others of students and school staff as their "partners" instead of "boyfriends" or "girlfriends."

He had second thoughts about hanging a sign in his office that reads: "Your identity is not an issue."

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When it comes to LGBTQ acceptance, female athletes are years ahead of the men.

As stigma surrounding gay athletes has diminished, men remain reluctant to come out.

An estimated 50 LGBTQ athletes from around the world will compete during the 2016 Rio Olympics.

It makes these 2016 games, quite literally, the gayest Olympics in modern history with more than double the number that Outsports reported participating in the 2012 games.

What does this tell us? Nothing, really. It's not as though there's been some recent flood of gay and bisexual athletes into the world of elite sports over the past four years. Rather, it's far more likely that LGBTQ athletes have been part of the Olympics all along, just closeted.

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