A new fairytale has a lesbian heroine. It's equal parts cute and important.

Who needs a Prince Charming anyway?

Meet Rosaline, the heroine of an important new love story.

Art by Michael Scanlon, and animation by Ida M. Schouw Andreasen.


In her tale, Rosaline packs a lunch with veggies from her emerald green garden and ventures over to her sweetheart's house.

But in order to get there, she has to overcome a few unforeseen obstacles.

Like a tricky witch.

Art by Michael Scanlon, and animation by Ida M. Schouw Andreasen.

And a determined, hungry wolf.

Art by Michael Scanlon, and animation by Ida M. Schouw Andreasen.

Even her fairy godmother — although well-intentioned — becomes a road block.

Art by Michael Scanlon, and animation by Ida M. Schouw Andreasen.

Fortunately, Rosaline finally arrives safe and sound to her sweetheart's front door.

And, yes, her sweetheart is also a girl.

Art by Michael Scanlon, and animation by Ida M. Schouw Andreasen.

"Rosaline," Hulu's first animated kids' short featuring a lesbian heroine, premiered June 7, 2016.

According to its creator, Daniel Errico, the short — which is narrated by actress and LGBTQ advocate Teri Polo — helps to fill a crucial void in children's media.

"As a children’s author, I felt like my industry wasn’t really doing its part to help kids learn acceptance of themselves and others," Errico explained to Upworthy. "I think it’s important to show kids all forms of love and identity in a positive light from a young age, so that’s what 'Rosaline' is all about."

Advocates agree: Fair media representation for people who are LGBTQ is vital (and we could be doing a whole lot better at it).

It's something Errico takes seriously. Last year, his work, "The Bravest Knight Who Ever Lived," premiered on Hulu, becoming the streaming media company's first animated LGBTQ-themed short for kids.


It's no mistake that Rosaline's sweetheart doesn't share her skin color either.

"The more characters we have of different ethnicities [and] backgrounds, the better for kids," he said, noting he is committed to the We Need Diverse Books campaign.

"Rosaline" is a simple love story with the potential to change hearts and minds.

The media our children consume isn't just cute, it's "hugely impactful" in shaping the way they see themselves and the world around them, according to Errico.

And if even just one little girl can see herself in "Rosaline," I'd say it's a story worth telling.

Watch "Rosaline" below:

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