Patagonia put its money where its mouth is by refusing to sell to clients that destroy the environment.

When the anonymous creator of the hilarious "Midtown Uniform Instagram page  moved from Los Angeles to Murray Hill in New York City, they were shocked by the number of residents — many of whom work in the finance industry — that wore the same outfit: button-down shirt, a pair of slacks, and a Patagonia fleece vest.

“On my way to work each day, I noticed dozens of guys rocking the uniform,” they told Esquire. “Frankly, I was a little shocked. I didn't realize it was such a thing.”

Well now it looks as though the finance bros in Midtown may be getting new wardrobes, because Patagonia is ditching corporate clients in the finance industry to focus on clients that align with its new mission to “save our home planet.”

The corporate change went public after Binna Kim, president of the communications agency Vested (no relation to the clothing type), attempted to place a Patgonia order for a client and was rejected by a third-party vendor.

“Patagonia has nothing against your client or the finance industry, it’s just not an area they are currently marketing through our co-brand division,” the statement read, according to Kim's screen shot.

“While they have co-branded here in the past, the brand is really focused right now on only co-branding with a small collection of like-minded and brand aligned areas; outdoor sports that are relevant to the gear we design, regenerative organic farming, and environmental activism," the statement continued.

“I’m not too surprised that Patagonia is taking a closer look at how their brand is being used, and probably trying to not let Patagonia be synonymous with the ‘finance bro,’” Kim told BuzzFeed News.

According to the statement, Patagonia is now turning down potentially lucrative deals from clients that engage in economically-damaging practices, even if they're a business, political group or religious organization.

This landmark decision by Patagonia to protect its outdoor-friendly brand is a smart business decision. However, it’s also a great example of a company backing its brand promise and putting its money where its mouth is to protect the planet.

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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This story was originally published on The Mighty and originally appeared here on 07.21.17


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