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Laura Dell recently decided to stop by her mom's work and surprise her with some good news.

She handed over a small gift in a bag and her mom, Sharon Bloomingdale, dug right in. That's when the fun begins. Luckily, Dell filmed the one-minute encounter and uploaded the heart-melting video to YouTube.


All GIFs and images via Laura Dell/YouTube.

See, this was no ordinary gift. Oh no. It was the gift of amazing news — delivered by way of a onesie. And judging by the look on Bloomingdale's face, it was pretty much the best news ever.

She was totally overcome with emotion.

The news? Laura and her husband had adopted a baby.

Laura explained below the YouTube video she uploaded:

"My husband and I had been in the adoption process for about a year. My mom, who is adopted herself, knew that we were home study approved. She had no idea, though, that we had been matched, let alone that we had been placed. Needless to say, she received the shock of her life that day as she met her first grandbaby! She thought she was just getting an anniversary present.
PS - the onesie says 'Grandma's Little Girl'"

The overjoyed grandma knew that her daughter and son-in-law were in the process of adopting — they'd finished their home study and were waiting to be matched. But as adoptive parents know, the process can take a while.

So this surprise — that a beautiful 4-month-old baby named Ellie had joined their family — was a little unexpected.

There are a handful of moments in life that stick with us. Learning you're a grandparent is one of them ... and so is meeting your grandchild for the first time.

And how's this for a double whammy? Right after learning she was a grandma, Bloomingdale got to meet her new beautiful granddaughter.


Just look at that first encounter. So. Much. Love.

Adoption is far more nuanced than a one-minute video can even begin to capture, but one thing is for sure: The more people who love a new member of the family, the better.

And grandma? Well, she's bursting at the seams with love. "It'll be great for Ellie to see the video when she grows up and know that grandma loved her even before she got to know her," Laura told Huffington Post.

If you've got a minute (literally) and a tissue, watch this beautiful first meeting.

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