Ryan Reynolds does the 'Grace Kelly challenge' and wows with his voice and surprise guest

It's not uncommon for famous actors to be able to sing, but since we don't always get to see those talents, it's always a delight when they surprise us with their pipes.

It's also fun when they surprise us with cameo appearances from other celebrities in their videos, and when they combine the two? Well, that's when you get 36 million views in less than 24 hours.

Ryan Reynolds posted a video of him doing the TikTok "Grace Kelly challenge," which involves singing various harmonies for the chorus of Mika's 2007 song, "Grace Kelly." Right away, his harmonizing with himself evokes an "OH, wow, Ryan Reynolds has good pitch" reaction. But when his special guest pops in for the high harmonies, come on. This is just good, wholesome fun right here.


@vancityreynolds

Late to the Grace Kelly trend but way early for our movie musical. I ❤️ duets. (And Mika)

Undoubtedly, some of those 36 million views and counting are from people watching it over and over, because how can you not? Ryan Reynolds singing? Good. Surprise appearance by Will Ferrell? Good. Silly-but-perfect harmonies between two iconic comedians? Gooooood.

Speaking of perfect harmonies, here's an impressive example of what the Grace Kelly challenge brought to TikTok. Not as funny as the Reynolds-Ferrell duet, but absolutely gorgeous performance (courtesy of Jules x La).

And in case you've missed it, this is the original song by Mika that spawned the TikTok challenge.

MIKA - Grace Kelly (Official Video) www.youtube.com

Love seeing celebrities having fun and showing off their talents together. Reynolds and Ferrell are currently filming a holiday musical inspired by Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," which explains the period vests. The film, called "Spirited," is set to air on Apple TV+ this holiday season.

Ryan Reynolds and Will Ferrell in a Christmas musical? Definitely good. Thanks for making our day a little brighter, gentlemen.

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Shanda Lynn Poitra was born and raised on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. She lived there until she was 24 years old when she left for college at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks.

"Unfortunately," she says, "I took my bad relationship with me. At the time, I didn't realize it was so bad, much less, abusive. Seeing and hearing about abusive relationships while growing up gave me the mentality that it was just a normal way of life."

Those college years away from home were difficult for a lot of reasons. She had three small children — two in diapers, one in elementary school — as well as a full-time University class schedule and a part-time job as a housekeeper.

"I wore many masks back then and clothing that would cover the bruises," she remembers. "Despite the darkness that I was living in, I was a great student; I knew that no matter what, I HAD to succeed. I knew there was more to my future than what I was living, so I kept working hard."

While searching for an elective class during this time, she came across a one-credit, 20-hour IMPACT self-defense class that could be done over a weekend. That single credit changed her life forever. It helped give her the confidence to leave her abusive relationship and inspired her to bring IMPACT classes to other Native women in her community.

I walked into class on a Friday thinking that I would simply learn how to handle a person trying to rob me, and I walked out on a Sunday evening with a voice so powerful that I could handle the most passive attacks to my being, along with physical attacks."

It didn't take long for her to notice the difference the class was making in her life.

"I was setting boundaries and people were either respecting them or not, but I was able to acknowledge who was worth keeping in my life and who wasn't," she says.

Following the class, she also joined a roller derby league where she met many other powerful women who inspired her — and during that summer, she found the courage to leave her abuser.

"As afraid as I was, I finally had the courage to report the abuse to legal authorities, and I had the support of friends and family who provided comfort for my children and I during this time," she says.

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via Matt Radick / Flickr

Joe Biden reversed Donald Trump's ban on transgender people serving in the military earlier this year, allowing the entire LGBTQ community to serve for the first time.

Anti-gay sentiment in the U.S. military goes as far back as 1778 when Lieutenant Frederick Gotthold Enslin was convicted at court-martial on charges of sodomy and perjury. The military would go on to make sodomy a crime in 1920 and worthy of dishonorable discharge.

In 1949 the Department of Defense standardized its anti-LGBT regulations across the military, declaring: "Homosexual personnel, irrespective of sex, should not be permitted to serve in any branch of the Armed Forces in any capacity, and prompt separation of known homosexuals from the Armed Forces is mandatory."

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