Former White House photographer shares 'Obamagate' images as proof of Obama's heinous crimes

On May 11, 2020, a reporter from the Washington Post asked President Trump:

"Mr. President, in one of your Mother's Day tweets you appear to accuse President Obama of 'the biggest political crime in American history by far.' Those were your words. What crime exactly are you accusing President Obama of committing, and do you believe the Justice Department should prosecute him?"

President Trump answered with the most tremendous non-answer in the history of non-answers:

"Obamagate. It's been going on for a long time. It's been going on from before I even got elected. And it's a disgrace that it happened. And if you look at what's gone on, and if you look at now, all of this information that's being released. And from what I understand, that's only the beginning. Some terrible things happened, and it should never be allowed to happen in our country again.

And you'll be seeing what's going on over the next — over the coming weeks. But I — and I wish you'd write honestly about it, but unfortunately, you choose not to do so."


Miraculously unfazed by this response, the reporter asked again: "What is the crime exactly that you're accusing him of?"

Trump refused to say what Obama did wrong, saying only, "You know what the crime is. The crime is very obvious to everybody. All you have to do is read the newspapers—except yours."

Take that, lamestream media! How dare a reporter ask the president questions? It's only his job. And why would you expect the president to directly answer a question about something as mundane as accusing a former president of committing the worst political crime in history?

Clearly, if you're a sitting president and you believe your predecessor committed a serious crime, a Tweet on Mother's Day is exactly the place and time to announce it. Not.

And why would Trump have to even know that the crime is? We have thousands of conspiracy theory-pushing minions and Russian bots and ranting YouTubers to take care of those pesky details. Duh.

Besides, we don't need an answer. We have ample photographic evidence of the heinous crimes Obama committed while he sat in the Oval Office. In fact, his own White House photographer has leaked a bunch of them on Instagram. (Thank goodness for social media or we'd never know what's true!)

Pete Souza shared two collections of photos that are so damning you might want to sit down before you look at them.

Reaching over a glass shield at Chipotle? HE'S the one responsible for the spread of this pandemic, isn't he? I bet he had the novel coronavirus dripping off of that finger. #ThanksObama

Pete Souza/Instagram

Feet on the desk? How dare he?!

LOCK HIM UP!

LOCK HIM UP!

Pete Souza/Instagram

He used a selfie stick, people. A SELFIE STICK. It's unprecedented. How is anyone okay with this? Wake up, America!

Pete Souza/Instagram

And this hat? This hat is A CRIME THAT SPEAKS FOR ITSELF.

Pete Souza/Instagram

And just look at how sneaky he is. Did he not think we were going to notice him holding his wife's hand? Does he think we're all a bunch of gullible sheep? We can see the truth with our own eyes. WHAT ARE YOU TRYING TO HIDE HERE?

Pete Souza/Instagram

That's not even the half of it.

Sitting on a desk? So immature and unpresidential. Thank goodness he's not around to embarrass the nation and sully the office of the presidency with his press briefing meltdowns, Twitter tantrums, and cyberbullying anymore.

Oh wait...just scratch that last part.

Pete Souza/Instagram

And look at him riding a bike without a helmet. Why does he think he's above the law?

Pete Souza/Instagram

Even when he did wear a helmet, he wore belted khaki shorts with socks and soccer slip-ons, which has to be illegal.

Pete Souza/Instagram

These dad jeans—who does Obama think he is?

Pete Souza/Instagram

But this right here, this is the final straw. A tan suit? Does he think that just because he's finer than fine, he can get away with whatever he wants? No. The American people will not stand for this affront to the rule of law.

Pete Souza/Instagram

If you swipe through the Instagram collections and view all of the evidence with an open mind, there's no way you can say that the man doesn't deserve hard jail time. He and everyone who was conspired with him in these outrageous crimes should be locked up.

After all, who would know better than the White House photographer—who also happened to be White House photographer for President Reagan—who followed the President around day in and day out for eight years and took 1.9 million photos? Nobody, that's who.

Thank you for revealing the truth at the heart of Obamagate, Pete Souza. America deserves it.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.