Former WH photographer just revealed how Obama dealt with an anti-immigration heckler.

Former White House photographer Pete Souza has earned over 2.1 million Instagram followers for sharing his beautiful and revealing photos of the Obama family during his two terms in office.

In the Trump era, he’s often used his social media platform to compare and contrast the two presidents.

After Melania Trump refused to hold the president’s hand, he shared photos of Michelle and Barack in a loving embrace.


View this post on Instagram

Holding hands.

A post shared by Pete Souza (@petesouza) on

After Trump's disrespectful bullying of “Morning Joe” co-host Mika Brzezinski, Souza shared a series of photos highlighting Obama’s respect for women.

Souza considers himself apolitical, he also covered the Reagan White House from 1983 to 1989. However, he trolls Trump because he believes he has disrespected the office of the presidency.

“I think what’s changed me is... he disrespects the office of the presidency and he disrespects other people,” Souza told CCN’s Jake Tapper. “He bullies people, he lies, he calls you guys ‘the enemy of the people,’ he doesn’t believe our own intelligence agencies, he trashes his own attorney general, and what he calls ‘his Justice Department.’ There’s just too many things that is not normal for a president to be doing.”

Souza recently shared a photo series from a 2014 speech in Austin, Texas in which Obama was heckled by critics in the audience.

Obama’s reaction stands in stark contrast to Trump, who has urged his crowds at his campaign rallies to beat hecklers.

Here’s an excerpt from Souza’s post:

President Obama was in Austin, Texas, back in 2014 to give a speech on the economy. When he brought up immigration towards the end of his remarks, a couple of young men started heckling him.⁣

"I’m sorry, what are you yelling about now?," the President said back. "Sit down, guys. I’m almost done. I’ll talk to you afterwards, I promise. I’ll bring you back. I’m wrapping things up here."

They heckled some more.⁣

"I’m on your side, man," the President replied. "Sit down, guys, we’ll talk about it later, I promise."

And finally he was able to finish his talk.⁣

via Pete Souza / Instagram

As he was walking offstage, he motioned to the two young hecklers in the crowd to come backstage.⁣

via Pete Souza / Instagram

And then sure enough, President Obama–in private, away from the glare of the media–engaged in a conversation about immigration policy with these two young men, under the watchful eye of the Secret Service:

via Pete Souza / Instagram

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."