Macy's pulls plates from their stores for sending a 'toxic message'
Alie Ward

Your dinner plate shouldn't shame you for eating off of it. But that's exactly what a set being sold at Macy's did.

The retailer has since removed the dinnerware from their concept shop, Story, after facing social media backlash for the "toxic message" they were sending.

The plates, made by Pourtions, have circles on them to indicate what a proper portion should look like, along with "helpful β€” and hilarious β€” visual cues" to keep people from "overindulging."

There are serval different styles, with one version labeling the largest portion as "mom jeans," the medium portion as "favorite jeans," and the smallest portion as "skinny jeans."


This troublesome imagery rubbed people the wrong way, with some accusing the plates' messaging of encouraging eating disorders.

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Alie Ward first Tweeted about the plates, writing: "How can I get these plates from @Macys banned in all 50 states."

Ward later told the Huffington Postthe plates reminded herof the "moms to young girls to guys who dismiss centuries of crushing beauty standards and laugh them off." Ward joked about banning the plates because she "just wanted to show the world how insidious beauty culture, and in this case one that shames women, can be. But I wanted Macy's to know that what they carry and display matters, it can hurt people, and they're accountable for it."

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Other people on Twitter echoed Ward's sentiments, saying the plates promoted unhealthy behavior and were guilty of fat shaming.








As a result, Macy's decided to pull the plates from Story. "Hi, Alie β€” we appreciate you sharing this with us and agree that we missed the mark on this product. It will be removed from all STORY at Macy's locations," Macy's Tweeted.


It's great that Macy's stepped up to the plate and drew a line. The difference between being a "foodie" and being in a "food coma" isn't a line on your dinnerware. Nobody should feel judged by an inanimate object.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message β€” 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again β€” and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.