Macy's pulls plates from their stores for sending a 'toxic message'
Alie Ward

Your dinner plate shouldn't shame you for eating off of it. But that's exactly what a set being sold at Macy's did.

The retailer has since removed the dinnerware from their concept shop, Story, after facing social media backlash for the "toxic message" they were sending.

The plates, made by Pourtions, have circles on them to indicate what a proper portion should look like, along with "helpful β€” and hilarious β€” visual cues" to keep people from "overindulging."

There are serval different styles, with one version labeling the largest portion as "mom jeans," the medium portion as "favorite jeans," and the smallest portion as "skinny jeans."


This troublesome imagery rubbed people the wrong way, with some accusing the plates' messaging of encouraging eating disorders.

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Alie Ward first Tweeted about the plates, writing: "How can I get these plates from @Macys banned in all 50 states."

Ward later told the Huffington Postthe plates reminded herof the "moms to young girls to guys who dismiss centuries of crushing beauty standards and laugh them off." Ward joked about banning the plates because she "just wanted to show the world how insidious beauty culture, and in this case one that shames women, can be. But I wanted Macy's to know that what they carry and display matters, it can hurt people, and they're accountable for it."

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Other people on Twitter echoed Ward's sentiments, saying the plates promoted unhealthy behavior and were guilty of fat shaming.








As a result, Macy's decided to pull the plates from Story. "Hi, Alie β€” we appreciate you sharing this with us and agree that we missed the mark on this product. It will be removed from all STORY at Macy's locations," Macy's Tweeted.


It's great that Macy's stepped up to the plate and drew a line. The difference between being a "foodie" and being in a "food coma" isn't a line on your dinnerware. Nobody should feel judged by an inanimate object.

This article originally appeared on 01.09.18


Why should a superintendent get a raise while teachers in the same district struggling to make ends meet see their paychecks flatline β€” year after year after year?

Teacher Deyshia Hargrave begged the question. Minutes later, she was handcuffed and placed in the backseat of a cop car.

The scene was captured below by YouTube user Chris Rosa, who attended a board meeting for Vermilion Parish Schools in Louisiana.

You can watch Hargrave begin speaking about 33 seconds in. The situation starts becoming contentious around 6:35 minutes. Hargrave is arrested at 8:35, and then walked outside in handcuffs and placed in the back of police vehicle. (Story continues below.)



"We work very hard with very little to maintain the salaries that we have," Hargrave, who teaches middle school language arts, said during a public comment portion of the meeting, stating that she's seen classroom sizes balloon during her time at the school with no increased compensation. "We're meeting those goals, while someone in that position of leadership [the superintendent] is getting raise? It's a sad, sad day to be a teacher in Vermilion Parish."

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