How To Prevent Your Racist Grandpa From Making Christmas Dinner The Most Awkward Meal Ever

Every family has one of them.

We all have someone in our family who doesn't understand that it's 2014 and their outdated ideas of entire communities of people should probably expire. But trying to convert out-of-touch people into model humans at Christmas dinner is a one-way ticket to awkward silence or yelling-past-each-other mode.

My coworker Franchesca Ramsey decided to help you with a strategy to make the holiday less bad. Just remember, as she says, "Around the dinner table isn't time for Social Justice 101."


For those who can't watch, I've included them below the video, from least effective to most.

1. Try SARCASM! Pros: You feel better about yourself, and a few relatives might get an awkward laugh. Cons: Nobody learns anything, and then dessert is a little aaaawkward.

2. Try STATISTICS! Pros: People learn something and you feel better about yourself. Cons: The out-of-touch person doesn't learn anything, and then dessert is a little more aaaawkward.

3. Try SMACKDOWNS! Pros: People raise their fists in the air, you feel better about yourself (as do others), and a few relatives get some closure because someone finally said something. Cons: Dessert is way awkward but empowering.

4. Try FEIGNING CONFUSION! Pros: It's a stealthy way of pulling a smackdown without people realizing it. The perpetrator might learn to think before they speak. Cons: Dessert may still be kinda awkward.

5. Try BEING HONEST! Pros: There won't be any more race jokes, and everyone will applaud your grace and maturity in a tense situation. Dessert will not be awkward. Cons: The next two minutes will be awkward. But it's going to be OK.

Trying to convert people at the dinner table to your line of thinking will probably end badly and defensively. But talking to them in private and thoughtfully laying out why it might not be a great idea to say awful things could end in a grown-up discussion. Which, frankly, all of us could use more of.

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