The other day, I came across this post on my Facebook page describing the way hermit crabs exchange shells. Never having given hermit crabs any thought, I almost passed it up, but the bold text "ALL EXCHANGE SHELLS IN SEQUENCE SO EVERYONE GETS A NEW HOME" caught my eye. Like, what?

I was astounded to find out that hermit crabs who need new, bigger shells will line up in a queue, biggest to smallest. When a crab that fits the largest empty shell shows up, the others all move up one shell, leaving the smallest shell empty at the end of the line.

Like, WHAT?!


Melody Flowers

I'm not one to believe every meme that comes through my social media feed, so I decided to research this myself. A 10-second Google search brought up a video of the entire process from the BBC and OH. MY. GOSH. This is seriously the best thing ever.

RELATED: Female orcas surrounded this grieving mom in a heartbreaking circle of solidarity.

If you're feeling the need to escape the news, watch this wholesome, under-recognized wonder of nature take place:

Amazing Crabs Shell Exchange | Life Story | BBC Earth www.youtube.com

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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