Every parent has a technique for dealing with tantrums. See why this dad's went viral.

Ari is 3 years old. And like many 3-year-olds, she recently had a mini-meltdown at Walmart.

Her dad, Terrel "Mr. Rico Relz" Crawford, knew his daughter wasn't hungry, sick, or especially tired. She simply had a case of the "gimmes." Instead of buying everything in sight to temper Ari's tantrum, Crawford opted to take her outside to the parking lot to let her calm down.


While outside, Crawford got on Facebook Live to talk about Ari's tantrum. And, in short order, his level-headed response went viral.

The Ohio father of four's six-minute video is funny and sincere, as Crawford is endlessly patient with young Ari. He begins by simply letting her feel her feelings, before asking the age-old parent question:

Then he calmly broke it down to her in age-appropriate language, explaining that they were going to stay put until she calmed down. If she acted up again, they'd be right back outside.

Crawford also took a few minutes to address his own parenting mishaps and challenges.

He reveals that sometimes he does give in too easily and occasionally spoils his kids, which may explain why Ari was so upset when she didn't get her way this time. Like all parents, he makes mistakes, but he never stops trying to improve.

Crawford also encouraged other parents to use words and time-outs, or as he called it, "an attitude break," instead of escalating the moment by yelling, spanking, or making a scene in public.

"I ain't got to argue with no 3-year-old kid, no 2-year old kid, no damn kid. I'm the daddy. I'm grown," he said with a small smile. "We about to sit down until you stop acting a fool..."

And, after just a few minutes, Ari was ready to return to the store, calm, collected, and already giggling, with another life lesson from Dad under her belt.

Crawford's ability to keep it 100 with his daughter, and the audience, may be why his video has more than 22 million views.

Crawford didn't expect his video to go viral, but clearly, his message struck a chord.

"I thinks it's due to the fact that as a parent we all [have encountered] the same exact situation, many times," he writes in an e-mail. "Seeing another person act or stand up usually sparks a fire that's honestly inside each and every one of us."

Because there's no way around it: Tantrums are going to happen.

You may not be able to go outside and cool down at every opportunity. That's OK. You may raise your voice or say things you don't mean. That's OK too. Kids (and parents) have their moments.

But at the end of the day, if you love, support, and value your kids, that's what they'll remember — not the occasional trip to the parking lot.

Whether you've been there before or just admire Crawford's cool, check out his video in its entirety.

When spoiled ass kids get told NO in Walmart

Posted by Terrel Rico Relz Crawford on Sunday, August 6, 2017
Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
True

Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

Keep Reading Show less

Even as millions of Americans celebrated the inauguration of President Joe Biden this week, the nation also mourned the fact that, for the first time in modern history, the United States did not have a peaceful transition of power.

With the violent attack on the U.S. Capitol on January 6, when pro-Trump insurrectionists attempted to stop the constitutional process of counting electoral votes and where terrorists threatened to kill lawmakers and the vice president for not keeping Trump in power, our long and proud tradition was broken. And although presidential power was ultimately transferred without incident on January 20, the presence of 20,000 National Guard troops around the Capitol reminded us of the threat that still lingers.

First Lady Jill Biden showed up today with cookies in hand for a group of National Guard troops at the Capitol to thank them for keeping her family safe. The homemade chocolate chip cookies were a small token of appreciation, but one that came from the heart of a mother whose son had served as well.

Keep Reading Show less
True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.