Ed Skrein got a lot of praise for dropping out of 'Hellboy' over whitewashing.

Ed Skrein's bold decision to drop out of the 'Hellboy' reboot is being met with praise.

Ed Skrein penned a heartfelt explanation for why he ultimately decided to turn down a role in the upcoming "Hellboy" reboot, and the internet took notice.

As of Dec. 21, 2017, his announcement has been retweeted more than 46,000 times and liked by more than 158,000 people on Twitter, and his name found its way to the top of trending lists across social media.

He wrote:


"It is clear that representing this character in a culturally accurate way holds significance for people, and that to neglect this responsibility would continue a worrying tendency to obscure ethnic minority stories and voices in the Arts. I feel it is important to honor and respect that."

He added, "Representation of ethnic diversity is important, especially to me as I have a mixed heritage family."

Some big-name Hollywood talent praised Skrein's decision, including a number of actors fresh off some recent breakout roles.

While missing out on one paycheck, Skrein's decision might actually help him land other roles.

Director Ava DuVernay and writer/producer Leonard Chang both gave a bit of a nod Skrein's way for his show of goodwill.

Doing the right thing goes a long way, and it earned Skrein a ton of new fans. Many of them realize he isn't yet a big name in Hollywood and turning down a big role was a huge risk.

"Hellboy" creator Mike Mignola and actor David Harbour, slated to play the titular character, offered some major kudos Skrein's way as well.

So why is Skrein getting so much praise for a decision that should be an industry standard? Because it's not yet the standard.

White actors being cast to play Asian roles isn't a new phenomenon, but Skrein's decision proves moviegoers are taking notice. Studios are being forced to consider casting decisions from an ethical point of view, early in the production process.

To have fans and whitewashing advocates loudly and proudly reinforcing his decision and to be heard by Hollywood's studio decision-makers, is a step in the right direction.

Most Shared
The Guardian / YouTube

Earlier this month, a beluga whale caught the world's attention by playing fetch with a rugby ball thrown by South African researchers off the waters of Norway.

The adorable video has been watched over 20 million times, promoting people across the globe to wonder how the whale became so comfortable around humans.

It's believed that the whale, known as Hvaldimir, was at some point, trained by the Russian military and was either released or escaped.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Facebook / Maverick Austin

Your first period is always a weird one. You know it's going to happen eventually, but you're not always expecting it. One day, everything is normal, then BAM. Puberty hits you in a way you can't ignore.

One dad is getting attention for the incredibly supportive way he handled his daughter's first period. "So today I got 'The Call,'" Maverick Austin started out a Facebook post that has now gone viral.

The only thing is, Austin didn't know he got "the call." His 13-year-old thought she pooped her pants. At that age, your body makes no sense whatsoever. It's a miracle every time you even think you know what's going on.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Instagram / Katie Sturino

Plus-size women are in the majority. In America, 68% of women wear a size 14 or higher. Yet many plus-sized are ignored by the fashion industry. Plus-sized clothing is a $21 billion industry, however only one-fifth of clothing sales are plus-sized. On top of that, plus-sized women are often body shamed, further reinforcing that bigger body types are not mainstream despite the fact that it is common.

Plus-size fashion blogger Katie Sturino recently called out her body shamers. Sturino runs the blog, The 12ish Style, showing that plus-sized fashion isn't – and shouldn't be – limited to clothes that hide the body.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
via Twitter / Soraya

There is a strange right-wing logic that suggests when minorities fight for equal rights it's somehow a threat to the rights already held by those in the majority or who hold power.

Like when the Black Lives Matter movement started, many on the right claimed that fighting for black people to be treated equally somehow meant that other people's lives were not as valuable, leading to the short-lived All Lives Matter movement.

This same "oppressed majority" logic is behind the new Straight Pride movement which made headlines in August after its march through the streets of Boston.

Keep Reading Show less
popular