Dutch Bros Coffee hopes to raise $1.5 million for ALS research on Drink One for Dane Day.

When Dutch Bros. Coffee founder Dane Boersma got terribly sick, the family thought he had Lyme disease. It turned out to be ALS.

At the time of his dad's diagnosis, Brant Boersma knew almost nothing about ALS. All he really knew was that Lou Gehrig had it and was forced to retire from baseball because of it.

"Now I know more than I wanted to," says Boersma. "This disease is brutal. It’s evil. To put it simply, you slowly become a prisoner to your body. In my Dad’s case it was slow moving, but when it’s so intimate to your life, time doesn’t matter anymore."


ALS is notoriously difficult to diagnose, especially in the early stages, because it mimics many other neurological disorders. It inexplicably causes motor neurons to die, slowly but surely taking away the ability to move, talk, eat, and breathe. Dane didn't receive a full diagnosis until had already had respiratory failure and was on a ventilator. But Brant and the rest of Dane's family had watched his decline with helplessness and confusion.

"Words don’t really matter or even compare to the feeling of watching your hero go through such a traumatic experience," says Boersma. "I just knew that I needed to be there with my family, by his side."

Dane passed away in 2009 after a four-year battle with ALS.

Dane (left) and Brant (right) Boersma, seven years before Dane's passing. Photo credit: Brant Boersma

Boersma created Drink One for Dane Day at Dutch Bros. to honor his dad and raise money for ALS research.

Boersma describes his dad as "an incredible man" and his personal hero. "He was like a social glue that brought a variety of people together," says Boersma. "He had so many friends and loved so many people." He was known to many by his nickname, The Wiseman.

After what his family went through with Dane's journey, Boersma wanted to do something to educate people about ALS. "Nobody really knew what it was," he says, "so we wanted to not just honor him, but bring awareness to this disease. Shed some light on what it is, bring it to people’s attention."

"Also," Boersma adds, "we wanted to remind those people that cared about him so much that life is happening and we should celebrate that."

And so Drink One for Dane Day was born. On May 10th, Dutch Bros. Coffee will dedicate all of their coffee sales to ALS research—and to the man who never let his debilitating disease get in the way of his love for a good cup of coffee.

Drink One for Dane Day raised $1.3 million for ALS research in 2018. Photo credit: Dutch Bros. Coffee

"Every Dutch Bros Coffee poured on Drink One for Dane Day will fund the Muscular Dystrophy Association’s (MDA) crucial ALS research which is critical to find a cure," says Boersma. "Since its inception, MDA has invested more than $165 million in ALS research, with $20 million having been spent in the last five years."

Drink One for Dane Day is as much a celebration of life as it is a fundraiser for a deadly disease.

More than 30,000 people will be diagnosed with ALS this year, and most will be given two to five years to live. There is no cure at this time.

Boersma hopes Drink One for Dane Day will help researchers find a way to treat the disease However, he says that the May 10th event is about much more than funding ALS research—it's a celebration of life and "a battle cry for love."

Boersma told Upworthy:

On Drink One for Dane Day, I cruise in to all the Dutch Bros stands in town. I buy drinks and toast with family, friends, and strangers. The day has become so much bigger than a disease. It has become this reminder that humanity is incredible. In spite of obstacles or pain, we rally together not only in the pursuit of conquering this horrific disease, but also to unite and celebrate what we have—the ability to make a difference not just in our own lives, but each other’s. Drink One for Dane Day is a battle cry for love, and that’s what my Dad did so well with his life. He fought for love, not just on an intimate level, but on a community level. So if you read this and you’re out there on May 10th, know that there’s a whole community of humans raising a cup to life and love and the ability to make a difference. And even if you can’t donate or swing through and grab a drink, take a minute and salute with us the hope and dream of a greater world.

In 2018, Drink One for Dane Day brought in $1.3 million for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. This year, they're shooting for $1.5 million.

Brant Boersma will be at the original Dutch Bros. stand in Grants Pass, Oregon on Drink One for Dane Day, raising a toast to his hero, The Wiseman. If you'd like to join him May 10th to help fund ALS research, find a Dutch Bros. location near you here.

When "bobcat" trended on Twitter this week, no one anticipated the unreal series of events they were about to witness. The bizarre bobcat encounter was captured on a security cam video and...well...you just have to see it. (Read the following description if you want to be prepared, or skip down to the video if you want to be surprised. I promise, it's a wild ride either way.)

In a North Carolina neighborhood that looks like a present-day Pleasantville, a man carries a cup of coffee and a plate of brownies out to his car. "Good mornin!" he calls cheerfully to a neighbor jogging by. As he sets his coffee cup on the hood of the car, he says, "I need to wash my car." Well, shucks. His wife enters the camera frame on the other side of the car.

So far, it's just about the most classic modern Americana scene imaginable. And then...

A horrifying "rrrrawwwww!" Blood-curdling screaming. Running. Panic. The man abandons the brownies, races to his wife's side of the car, then emerges with an animal in his hands. He holds the creature up like Rafiki holding up Simba, then yells in its face, "Oh my god! It's a bobcat! Oh my god!"

Then he hucks the bobcat across the yard with all his might.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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