+
upworthy
Joy

Heartbreaking TikTok of dog's last day captures hearts of pet owners online

"Making my boy's last day the best I can."

ellie buckler tiktok, pets tiktok, dogs tiktok

Dogs deserve all the love forever.

I don’t think I’m exaggerating by stating that losing a beloved pet is one of the most painful experiences ever. If pet owners are lucky enough to know that the rainbow bridge approaches, then sometimes there is the small mercy of being able to make that last day a truly special one.

Celebrating a pet’s final moments need not be an arduous event. According to the American Animal Hospital Association, it can be as simple as indulging on a last meal of forbidden treats, capturing photos and videos to use later for albums, or simply enjoying some of your favorite activities together. I will never forget the last day at the dog beach with our beautiful black lab named Estrella. We had to carry her in a little wagon across the sand, but her smile was there nonetheless.

No, it doesn’t really soften the blow, but creating ceremony around this inevitable tragedy of pet ownership can at least provide some peace. There is undeniably some inherent comfort in knowing that one last memory is full of love and nurturing to hold onto as we say goodbye. A dash of sweet to cope with the bitter, if you will.

A recent TikTok posted by Ellie Buckler (@ellibuckler) offered a touching glimpse into the last day spent with her good boy named Baxter.

The 12-year-old shar-pei was struggling with breathing and walking and was on lots of painkillers. Buckler felt that it was selfish to keep him as he suffered, so she made that never-easy decision to put him down. But that didn’t stop Buckler from giving him the best last day possible.

Warning: This video requires a box of tissues.


Baxter’s last day started off with a McDonald’s breakfast, followed by a “slow walk” to the shop for some ham. Buckler and Baxter would share the pack. She even let him try a small bit of chocolate for the first time, which he happily devoured and washed it all down with a nice cup of tea.

@elliebuckler Running in the big fields in the sky ❤️ love yoor forever baby boy 🌈 12 years wasnt long enough 😢 #dogslastday #fyp #bestfriend ♬ Stuff We Did (From "Up") - Mark Northam

And of course, it was a day filled with “lots of cuddles and kisses.”

His health might have been compromised, but his little tail could be seen wagging for the entire video. He could certainly feel the love being showered over him.

Then, the final car ride came. The TikTok ends with an actual rainbow caught on camera—perhaps a good omen for Baxter’s trip across planes.

Unsurprisingly, this video tore at peoples' hearts. Many sent their praise to Buckler for being such a caring owner. Others reflected on their own experiences of pet loss. And then some were simply crying at the heartbreaking video. Regardless, folks showed support in different ways.

TikTok

This video, though tear inducing to say the least, is a great example of how to make those final moments into a beautiful memory. Of course, one can celebrate a pet’s life in many ways—what matters is spending quality time with that sweet creature that has given love unconditionally. Rest easy Baxter, you are now in all of our hearts.

Image from YouTube video.

An emotional and strong Matt Diaz.


Matt Diaz has worked extremely hard to lose 270 pounds over the past six years.

But his proudest moment came in March 2015 when he decided to film himself with his shirt off to prove an important point about body positivity and self-love.

Keep ReadingShow less
Community

Man uses social media to teach others ASL so kids don't experience what he did as a child

Every child should be able to communicate in a way that works best for them.

Man teaches people ASL so no child experiences what he did

People start communicating from the moment they enter the world usually through cries, faces, grunts and squeals. Once infants move into the toddler phase the combine all of their previous communication skills with pointing and saying a few frequently used words like "milk," "mama," "dada" and "eat."

Children who are born without the ability to hear often still go through those same stages with the exception of their frequently used words being in sign language. But not all hearing parents know sign language, which can stunt the language skills of their non-hearing child. Ronnie McKenzie is an American Sign Language advocate that uses social media to teach others how to sign so deaf and nonverbal kids don't feel left out.

"But seriously i felt so isolated 50% of my life especially being outside of school i had NONE to sign ASL with. Imagine being restricted from your own language," McKenzie writes in his caption.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

Wife says husband's last name is so awful she can't give it to her kids. Is she right?

"I totally get we can’t shield kids from everything, and I understand the whole family ties thing, but c’mon."

A wife pleads with her husband to change their child's name.

Even though it’s 2023 and schools are much more concerned with protecting children from bullying than in the past, parents still have to be aware that kids will be kids, and having a child with a funny name is bound to cause them trouble.

A mother on Reddit is concerned that her future children will have the unfortunate last name of “Butt,” so she asked people on the namenerds forum to help her convince her husband to name their child something different.

(Note: We’re assuming that the person who wrote the post is a woman because their husband is interested in perpetuating the family name, and if it were a same-sex relationship, a husband probably wouldn’t automatically make that assumption.)

"My husband’s last name is Butt. Can someone please help me illuminate to him why this last name is less than ideal,” she asked the forum. “I totally get we can’t shield kids from everything and I understand the whole family ties thing, but c'mon. Am I being unreasonable by suggesting our future kid either take my name, a hybrid, or a new one altogether?"

Keep ReadingShow less
Joy

Bus driver comes to the rescue for boy who didn't have an outfit for school's Pajamas Day

“It hurt me so bad…I wanted him to have a good day. No child should have to miss out on something as small as pajama day.”

Representative Image from Canva

One thoughtful act can completely turn someone's day around.

On the morning just before Valentine’s Day, school bus driver Larry Farrish Jr. noticed something amiss with Levi, one of his first grade passengers, on route to Engelhard Elementary, part of Jefferson County Public School (JCPS) in Louisville, Kentucky.

On any other day, the boy would greet Farrish with a smile and a wave. But today, nothing. Levi sat down by himself, eyes downcast, no shining grin to be seen. Farrish knew something was up, and decided to inquire.

With a “face full of tears,” as described on the JCPS website, Levi told Farrish that today was “Pajama Day” at school, but he didn’t have any pajamas to wear for the special occasion.
Keep ReadingShow less
via Imgur

Memories of testing like this gets people fired up.

It doesn't take much to cause everyone on the internet to go a little crazy, so it's not completely surprising that an incorrect answer on a child's math test is the latest event to get people fired up.

The test in question asked kids to solve "5 x 3" using repeated addition. Under this method, the correct answer is "5 groups of 3," not "3 groups of 5." The question is typical of Common Core but has many questioning this type of standardized testing and how it affects learning.

Keep ReadingShow less
Joy

There are over 30 years between these amazing before-and-after photos.

"It's important for me for my photography to make people smile."

All photos by Chris Porsz/REX/Shutterstock.

Before and after photos separated by 30 years.


Chris Porsz was tired of studying sociology.

As a university student in the 1970s, he found the talk of economics and statistics completely mind-numbing. So instead, he says, he roamed the streets of his hometown of Peterborough, England, with a camera in hand, snapping pictures of the people he met and listening to their stories. To him, it was a far better way to understand the world.

He always looked for the most eccentric people he could find, anyone who stood out from the crowd. Sometimes he'd snap a single picture of that person and walk away. Other times he'd have lengthy conversations with these strangers.

Keep ReadingShow less