Business consultant Cindy Gallop  says she has the perfect advice for any woman negotiating her pay
via Next Conference

There are numerous reasons why women make 78 cents on the dollar compared to men. One of them is they do not ask for raises as often. According to NPR, men are four times more likely than women to ask for a salary raise.

This reluctance has a snowball effect. One small pay boost means bigger annual raises, bigger bonuses, and a larger salary being carried over to the next employer.

"I tell my graduate students that by not negotiating their job at the beginning of their career, they're leaving anywhere between $1 million and $1.5 million on the table in lost earnings over their lifetime," economist Linda Babcock of Carnegie Mellon University says.


Babcock also says that women can find negotiating their salary intimidating.

"They wait to be offered a salary increase," she says. "They wait to be offered a promotion. They wait to be assigned the task or team or job that they want. And those things typically don't happen very often."

The World Economic Forum says that women are reluctant to ask for a raise because due to a "quirk of biology and culture" they are prone to undervalue themselves. But when they do understand their value they are judged as bossy or difficult.

Cindy Gallop, who refers to herself as "a brand and business innovator, consultant, coach and keynote speaker," has worked with everyone from Levi's to Nike, and has some great advice for women who want to get the highest salary possible.


Gallop's advice inspired people to chime in and share how they got what they deserved while negotiating a salary.


In the end, it's all about getting what you're worth and not being afraid to ask for it. Gallop's advice is great because if women are undervaluing themselves, throwing out an audacious number to a potential employer might be right on the money.

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Pixabay

As people get older, social isolation and loneliness become serious problems. Many find themselves living alone for the first time after the death of a spouse. It's also difficult for older people to maintain friendships when people they've known for years become ill or pass away.

Census Bureau figures say that almost a quarter of men and nearly 46% of women over the age of 75 live alone.

But loneliness doesn't just affect those who reside by themselves. People can feel lonely when there is a discrepancy between their desired and actual relationships. To put it simply, when it comes to having a healthy social life, quality is just as important as quantity.

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