Watch Ivanka Trump try to speak with world leaders. Hint: It's a disaster.



Over the weekend, Ivanka Trump accompanied her father, President Donald Trump, to meetings with world leaders at the G20 summit in Osaka.

Why she was there, no one knows, because Ms. Trump does not hold any position of significance in the current administration. What we do know, however, is that Ivanka was not content just to hang on the sidelines and eat catered lunches. Instead, she tried to ingratiate herself with world leaders. And they were just as confused about what's going on as the rest of us.


A video released by the French Presidential Palace (according to journalist Parham Ghobadi) shows Ivanka Trump uncomfortably trying to hold her own in a conversation between Canadian PM Justin Trudeau, British PM Theresa May, French president Emmanuel Macron, and Christine Lagarde, the chairwoman of the International Monetary Fund. Please judge for yourself how well the first daughter (everyone always forgets about Tiffany Trump!) acquits herself when speaking with elected officials.

It's not very good, is it? And it bodes poorly for the American public if — as The Cut points out — Ivanka Trump hopes to one day ascend to the presidency herself. Especially considering how quick everyone was to show Ms. Trump that she wasn't welcome. Some might call this snobbery, but it seems fairly strange that Ivanka Trump would take her father's place in a conversation taking place between a small group of world leaders.

The video was immediately decried by American politicians. "It may be shocking to some, but being someone's daughter actually isn't a career qualification," Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez tweeted. "It hurts our diplomatic standing when the President phones it in & the world moves on."

Congressman Eric Salwell also called out Ms. Trump's behavior: "This is your reminder that @IvankaTrump has no foreign policy or diplomacy experience. The American people deserve to be represented by a qualified diplomat...not the President's daughter," he wrote on social media.

And both father and daughter were called out even further when Ivanka joined the president on his last-minute, unplanned trip to North Korea and sat in on a closed-door meeting between Trump and Kim Jong-Un. Speaking to The New York Times, former ambassador to Russia, Michael McFaul, said "Ivanka Trump is not on the National Security Council — she is not an adviser on the issues being discussed. So her presence undermines the professional look of the Trump delegation, both to other countries and to national security professionals in the Trump administration."

If there's one good thing to come out of the rampant nepotism this administration has wrought, it's the fact that the G20 video was immediately and roundly mocked before being turned into June's last powerful meme. Currently #UnwantedIvanka, is sitting at the top of Twitter's trending topics. And the memes, which feature Ivanka Trump photoshopped into other places where she doesn't belong — at the Overlook hotel; helping Marie Curie make scientific discoveries — are a little bit of a balm for the indignities The Trumps continue to visit upon us. We must continue to resist! But in the meantime, enjoy these memes, too.






We know that mammals feed their young with milk from their own bodies, and we know that whales are mammals. But the logistics of how some whales make breastfeeding happen has been a bit of a mystery for scientists. Such has been the case with sperm whales.

Sperm whales are uniquely shaped, with humongous, block-shaped heads that house the largest brains in the animal world. Like other cetaceans, sperm whale babies rely on their mother's milk for sustenance in their first year or two. And also like other cetaceans, a sperm whale mama's nipple is inverted—it doesn't stick out from her body like many mammals, but rather is hidden inside a mammary slit.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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