'The Trump Kids Go to Work with Dad: A White House Storybook.'

Meet the Trump kids: Ivanka, Eric, and Donald Jr. ...

Photo by Timothy A. Clary/Getty Images.

...their friend Jared...

Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.


...and their dad Donald.

Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

Donald has a very important job.

Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

He's the president of the United States of America.

Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images.

April 27, 2017, is Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day.

Photo via iStock.

The Trump kids and Jared are going to work with Donald.

Photo by Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images.

Most kids would be excited.

Photo via iStock.

But not the Trumps. The Trumps are luckier than most kids.

Photo by Timothy A. Clary/Getty Images.

They get to go to work with their dad every day!

Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images.

Donald doesn't really seem to like to do work.

Photo by Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images.

He likes to watch TV and yell at strangers on the internet.

Photo by Patrick Pleul/picture-alliance/AP.

So the Trump kids have a lot of responsibility...

Photo by Jim Watson/Getty Images.

...even though Eric is only 33, Ivanka is only 35, Jared is only 36, and Donald Jr. is only 39.

Photo by Grant Lamos IV/Getty Images.

Jared and Ivanka do a lot of important jobs for Donald — jobs that most people don't get to do without years and years of experience.

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

But they can do them — no sweat!

Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

Ivanka meets with foreign leaders.

Photo by Saul Loeb/Getty Images.

And gives speeches.

Photo by Odd Andersen/Getty Images.

And goes to important meetings with important people.

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Jared is in charge of fixing the whole government.

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And making peace in the Middle East.

Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images.

And fighting ISIS in Iraq.

Photo by Dominique A. Pineiro/DoD via Getty Images.

He has to dress up like a big boy, but that's OK. Jared doesn't mind.

Photo by Dominique A. Pineiro/DoD via Getty Images.

Then there's Donald Jr. and Eric. They run their dad’s old company, so they’re not supposed to come to his new job with him. That would be a conflict of interest.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

But sometimes they do anyway. Oops!

Photo by Timothy A. Clary/Getty Images.

They even let their dad give them business advice.

Photo by Timothy A. Clary/Getty Images.

Even though they're not supposed to. Talking to the president would give their company an unfair advantage over other companies.

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Double oops!

Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images.

Leaders of other countries know how much Donald loves his kids, so they like to do nice things for them.

Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

They think if they help the Trump kids out, Donald might do nice things for their countries in return.

Photo by Johannes Simon/Getty Images.

They listen when Ivanka asks them to give money to her new foundation.

Photo by Michael Sohn/Getty Images.

And they let her build hotels in their countries.

Some countries help Jared build tall buildings too.

Photo by Eric Baradat/Getty Images.

Donald was going to get tough on China.

Photo by Fabrice Coffrini/Getty Images.

But then a Chinese company invested in one of the buildings Jared builds.

Photo by Eric Baradat/Getty Images.

Lately, Donald hasn't been so tough on China at all.

Photo by Jim Watson/Getty Images.

It might seem strange how much the Trumps love Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day.

Photo by Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images.

But by going to work with their dad, Ivanka, Jared, Donald Jr., and Eric are learning all about what it’s like to be a grown-up.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

They're getting hands-on experience at a real-life job.

Photo by J. Scott Applewhite - Pool/Getty Images

And, best of all, they’re all making their own money!

Photo by Mandel Ngan/Getty Images.

Maybe lots and lots of it. Maybe not.

Photo by Timothy A. Clary/Getty Images.

Maybe even money from some of the countries that do nice things for them. Maybe not.

Photo by Fred Dufour/Getty Images.

We don't know because Donald hasn't released his tax returns.

Photo by Ron Sachs/Pool/Getty Images.

What a good deal for the Trumps!

Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images.

Donald smiles. He's just happy his kids are happy.

Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

And he's happy he can keep on watching TV and yelling at people on the internet.

Photo by Patrick Pleul/picture-alliance/dpa/AP.

"I'm so glad every day is Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day in our family," he probably thinks to himself.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

And so it was.

Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images.

(To be continued.)

(For four freaking years.)

(At least.)

(Unless you call your representatives and demand they, you know, do their jobs and start asking questions about all this. Like yesterday.)

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